Movement



[moov-muh nt] /ˈmuv mənt/

noun
1.
the act, process, or result of moving.
2.
a particular manner or style of moving.
3.
Usually, movements. actions or activities, as of a person or a body of persons.
4.
Military, Naval. a change of position or location of troops or ships.
5.
abundance of events or incidents.
6.
rapid progress of events.
7.
the progress of events, as in a narrative or drama.
8.
Fine Arts. the suggestion of motion in a work of art, either by represented gesture in figurative painting or sculpture or by the relationship of structural elements in a design or composition.
9.
a progressive development of ideas toward a particular conclusion:
the movement of his thought.
10.
a series of actions or activities intended or tending toward a particular end:
the movement toward universal suffrage.
11.
the course, tendency, or trend of affairs in a particular field.
12.
a diffusely organized or heterogeneous group of people or organizations tending toward or favoring a generalized common goal:
the antislavery movement; the realistic movement in art.
13.
the price change in the market of some commodity or security:
an upward movement in the price of butter.
14.
.
15.
the working parts or a distinct portion of the working parts of a mechanism, as of a watch.
16.
Music.

17.
Prosody. rhythmical structure or character.
/ˈmuːvmənt/
noun
1.

2.
the manner of moving
3.

4.
a trend or tendency in a particular sphere
5.
the driving and regulating mechanism of a watch or clock
6.
(often pl) a person’s location and activities during a specific time
7.

8.
(music) a principal self-contained section of a symphony, sonata, etc, usually having its own structure
9.
tempo or pace, as in music or literature
10.
(fine arts) the appearance of motion in painting, sculpture, etc
11.
(prosody) the rhythmic structure of verse
12.
a positional change by one or a number of military units
13.
a change in the market price of a security or commodity
n.

late 14c., from Old French movement “movement, exercise; start, instigation” (Modern French mouvement), from Medieval Latin movimentum, from Latin movere (see move (v.)). In the musical sense of “major division of a piece” it is attested from 1776; in the political/social sense, from 1828. Related: Movements.

movement move·ment (mōōv’mənt)
n.

In music, a self-contained division of a long work; each movement usually has its own tempo. A long, undivided composition is said to be in one movement.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Move-out

    [moov-out] /ˈmuvˌaʊt/ noun 1. an act or instance of vacating a living or working place: With so many business move-outs, the local economy is suffering.

  • Mover

    [moo-ver] /ˈmu vər/ noun 1. a person or thing that . 2. Often, movers. a person or company whose business is the of household effects or office equipment from one location to another. 3. a powerful and influential person, as in politics or business. 4. a person who is energetic and ambitious; go-getter. Idioms 5. […]



  • Mover and shaker

    A person who wields power and influence in a particular activity or field, as in He’s one of the movers and shakers in the art world. At first the two nouns referred specifically to God, alluding to the belief that a divine force was responsible for all events. The current usage refers only to human […]

  • Moves

    [moov] /muv/ verb (used without object), moved, moving. 1. to pass from one place or position to another. 2. to go from one place of residence to another: They moved from Tennessee to Texas. 3. to advance or progress: The red racing car moved into the lead. 4. to have a regular , as an […]



Disclaimer: Movement definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.