My fair lady

An American musical comedy of 1956, with words by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe. My Fair Lady is based on the play Pygmalion, by George Bernard Shaw, about a professor in London who teaches a low-born flower girl how to speak and act like the nobility. The songs “On the Street Where You Live” and “I Could Have Danced All Night” come from My Fair Lady.


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    jargon, language (MFTL) Describes a talk on a programming language design that is heavy on syntax (with lots of BNF), sometimes even talks about semantics (e.g. type systems), but rarely, if ever, has any content (see content-free). More broadly applied to talks – even when the topic is not a programming language — in which […]

  • My foot

    interjection in a pig’s ass, my ass: She’s the greatest my eye/ You’ll do that my foot [first form 1842+; in the early and obsolete meaning ”nonsense,” perhaps fr a Joe Miller joke in which a Latin nonsense phrase O mihi, beate Martine (”O, to me, blessed Martin”) is pronounced as all my eye and […]

  • My god

    Also, my goodness. Expressions of shock, surprise, or dismay, as in My God, don’t tell me he’s dying, or My goodness, what an awful outfit. The first term dates from about 1800; goodness in the variant is a euphemism for God.

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    I don’t feel at all sorry for you, I don’t sympathize, as in You only got a five percent raise? My heart bleeds for you. Originating in the late 1300s, this hyperbolic expression of sympathy has been used ironically since the mid-1700s.

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