Offed



[awf, of] /ɔf, ɒf/

adverb
1.
so as to be no longer supported or attached:
This button is about to come off.
2.
so as to be no longer covering or enclosing:
to take a hat off; to take the wrapping off.
3.
away from a place:
to run off; to look off toward the west.
4.
away from a path, course, etc.; aside:
This road branches off to Grove City.
5.
so as to be away or on one’s way:
to start off early; to cast off.
6.
away from what is considered normal, regular, standard, or the like:
to go off on a tangent.
7.
from a charge or price:
He took 10 percent off for all cash purchases.
8.
at a distance in space or future time:
to back off a few feet; Summer is only a week off.
9.
out of operation or effective existence:
Turn the lights off.
10.
into operation or action:
The alarm goes off at noon.
11.
so as to interrupt continuity or cause discontinuance:
Negotiations have been broken off.
12.
in absence from work, service, a job, etc.:
two days off at Christmas.
13.
completely; utterly:
to kill off all the inhabitants.
14.
with prompt or ready performance:
to dash a letter off.
15.
to fulfillment, or into execution or effect:
The contest came off on the appointed day.
16.
into nonexistence or nothingness:
My headache passed off soon.
17.
so as to be delineated, divided, or apportioned:
Mark it off into equal parts.
18.
away from a state of consciousness:
I must have dozed off.
19.
Nautical. away from the land, a ship, the wind, etc.
preposition
20.
so as no longer to be supported by, attached to, on, resting on, or unified with:
Take your feet off the table! Break a piece of bread off the loaf.
21.
deviating from:
off balance; off course.
22.
below or less than the usual or expected level or standard:
20 percent off the marked price; I was off my golf game.
23.
away, disengaged, or resting from:
to be off duty on Tuesdays.
24.
Informal. refraining or abstaining from; denying oneself the pleasure, company, practice, etc., of:
He’s off gambling.
25.
away from; apart or distant from:
a village off the main road.
26.
leading into or away from:
an alley off 12th Street.
27.
not fixed on or directed toward, as the gaze, eyes, etc.:
Their eyes weren’t off the king for a moment.
28.
Informal. from (a specified source):
I bought it off a street vendor.
29.
from or of, indicating material or component parts:
to lunch off cheese and fruit.
30.
from or by such means or use of:
living off an inheritance; living off his parents.
31.
Nautical. at some distance to seaward of:
off Cape Hatteras.
adjective
32.
in error; wrong:
You are off on that point.
33.
slightly abnormal or not quite sane:
He is a little off, but he’s really harmless.
34.
not up to standard; not so good or satisfactory as usual; inferior or subnormal:
a good play full of off moments.
35.
no longer in effect, in operation, or in process:
The agreement is off.
36.
stopped from flowing, as by the closing of a valve:
The electricity is off.
37.
in a specified state, circumstance, etc.:
to be badly off for money.
38.
(of time) free from work or duty; nonworking:
a pastime for one’s off hours.
39.
not working at one’s usual occupation:
We’re off Wednesdays during the summer.
40.
of less than the ordinary activity, liveliness, or lively interest; slack:
an off season in the tourist trade.
41.
unlikely; remote; doubtful:
on the off chance that we’d find her at home.
42.
more distant; farther:
the off side of a wall.
43.
(of a vehicle, single animal, or pair of animals hitched side by side) of, being, or pertaining to the right as seen from the rider’s or driver’s viewpoint (opposed to ):
the off horse; the off side.
44.
starting on one’s way; leaving:
I’m off to Europe on Monday. They’re off and running in the third race at Aqueduct.
45.
lower in price or value; down:
Stock prices were off this morning.
46.
Nautical. noting one of two like things that is the farther from the shore; seaward:
the off side of the ship.
47.
Cricket. noting or pertaining to that side of the wicket or of the field opposite that on which the batsman stands.
noun
48.
the state or fact of being off.
49.
Cricket. the off side.
verb (used without object)
50.
to go off or away; leave (used imperatively):
Off, and don’t come back!
verb (used with object)
51.
Slang. to kill; slay.
Verb phrases
52.
get off on. (def 57).
Idioms
53.
get it off. (def 54).
54.
off and on,

55.
off of, Informal. off:
Take your feet off of the table!
56.
off with,

[dahy] /daɪ/
verb (used without object), died, dying.
1.
to cease to live; undergo the complete and permanent cessation of all vital functions; become dead.
2.
(of something inanimate) to cease to exist:
The laughter died on his lips.
3.
to lose force, strength, or active qualities:
Superstitions die slowly.
4.
to cease to function; stop:
The motor died.
5.
to be no longer subject; become indifferent:
to die to worldly matters.
6.
to pass gradually; fade or subside gradually (usually followed by away, out, or down):
The storm slowly died down.
7.
Theology. to lose spiritual life.
8.
to faint or languish.
9.
to suffer as if fatally:
I’m dying of boredom!
10.
to pine with desire, love, longing, etc.:
I’m dying to see my home again.
11.
to desire or want keenly or greatly:
I’m dying for a cup of coffee.
Verb phrases
12.
die away, (of a sound) to become weaker or fainter and then cease:
The hoofbeats gradually died away.
13.
die down, to become calm or quiet; subside.
14.
die off, to die one after another until the number is greatly reduced:
Her friends are dying off.
15.
die out,

Idioms
16.
die hard,

17.
die standing up, Theater. (of a performance) to be received with silence rather than applause.
18.
never say die, never give up hope; never abandon one’s efforts.
19.
to die for, stunning; remarkable:
That dress is to die for.
/daɪ/
verb (mainly intransitive) dies, dying, died
1.
(of an organism or its cells, organs, etc) to cease all biological activity permanently: she died of pneumonia
2.
(of something inanimate) to cease to exist; come to an end: the memory of her will never die
3.
often foll by away, down, or out. to lose strength, power, or energy, esp by degrees
4.
often foll by away or down. to become calm or quiet; subside: the noise slowly died down
5.
to stop functioning: the engine died
6.
to languish or pine, as with love, longing, etc
7.
(usually foll by of) (informal) to be nearly overcome (with laughter, boredom, etc)
8.
(theol) to lack spiritual life within the soul, thus separating it from God and leading to eternal punishment
9.
(transitive) to undergo or suffer (a death of a specified kind) (esp in phrases such as die a saintly death)
10.
(foll by to) to become indifferent or apathetic (to): to die to the world
11.
(informal) never say die, never give up
12.
die hard, to cease to exist after resistance or a struggle: old habits die hard
13.
die in harness, to die while still working or active, prior to retirement
14.
be dying, foll by for or an infinitive. to be eager or desperate (for something or to do something): I’m dying to see the new house
15.
(informal) to die for, highly desirable: a salary to die for
/daɪ/
noun
1.

2.
an internally-threaded tool for cutting external threads Compare tap2 (sense 6)
3.
a casting mould giving accurate dimensions and a good surface to the object cast See also die-cast
4.
(architect) the dado of a pedestal, usually cubic
5.
another name for dice (sense 2)
6.
as straight as a die, perfectly honest
7.
the die is cast, the decision that commits a person irrevocably to an action has been taken
/ɒf/
preposition
1.
used to indicate actions in which contact is absent or rendered absent, as between an object and a surface: to lift a cup off the table
2.
used to indicate the removal of something that is or has been appended to or in association with something else: to take the tax off potatoes
3.
out of alignment with: we are off course
4.
situated near to or leading away from: just off the High Street
5.
not inclined towards: I’m off work, I’ve gone off you
adverb
6.
(particle) so as to be deactivated or disengaged: turn off the radio
7.
(particle)

8.
spent away from work or other duties: take the afternoon off
9.

10.
out from the shore or land: the ship stood off
11.

12.
away in the future: August is less than a week off
13.
(particle) so as to be no longer taking place: the match has been rained off
14.
(particle) removed from contact with something, as clothing from the body: the girl took all her clothes off
15.
offstage: noises off
16.
(commerce) (used with a preceding number) indicating the number of items required or produced: please supply 100 off
17.
off and on, on and off, occasionally; intermittently: he comes here off and on
18.
(interjection) off with, a command, often peremptory, or an exhortation to remove or cut off (something specified): off with his head, off with that coat, my dear
adjective
19.
not on; no longer operative: the off position on the dial
20.
(postpositive) not or no longer taking place; cancelled or postponed: the meeting is off
21.
in a specified condition regarding money, provisions, etc: well off, how are you off for bread?
22.
unsatisfactory or disappointing: his performance was rather off, an off year for good tennis
23.
(postpositive) in a condition as specified: I’d be better off without this job
24.
(postpositive) no longer on the menu; not being served at the moment: sorry, love, haddock is off
25.
(postpositive) (of food or drink) having gone bad, sour, etc: this milk is off
noun
26.
(cricket)

verb
27.
(transitive) to kill (someone)
adv.

by c.1200 as an emphatic form of Old English of (see of), employed in the adverbial use of that word. The prepositional meaning “away from” and the adjectival sense of “farther” were not firmly fixed in this variant until 17c., but once they were they left the original of with the transferred and weakened senses of the word. Meaning “not working” is from 1861. Off the cuff (1938) is from the notion of speaking from notes written in haste on one’s shirt cuffs. Off the rack (adj.) is from 1963; off the record is from 1933; off the wall “crazy” is 1968, probably from the notion of a lunatic “bouncing off the walls” or else in reference to carom shots in squash, handball, etc.
v.

“to kill,” 1930, from off (adv.). Earlier verbal senses were “to defer” (1640s), “to move off” (1882). Related: Offed.
v.

mid-12c., possibly from Old Danish døja or Old Norse deyja “to die, pass away,” both from Proto-Germanic *dawjanan (cf. Old Frisian deja “to kill,” Old Saxon doian, Old High German touwen, Gothic diwans “mortal”), from PIE root *dheu- (3) “to pass away, become senseless” (cf. Old Irish dith “end, death,” Old Church Slavonic daviti, Russian davit’ “to choke, suffer”).

It has been speculated that Old English had *diegan, from the same source, but it is not in any of the surviving texts and the preferred words were steorfan (see starve), sweltan (see swelter), wesan dead, also forðgan and other euphemisms.

Languages usually don’t borrow words from abroad for central life experiences, but “die” words are an exception, because they are often hidden or changed euphemistically out of superstitious dread. A Dutch euphemism translates as “to give the pipe to Maarten.” Regularly spelled dege through 15c., and still pronounced “dee” by some in Lancashire and Scotland. Used figuratively (of sounds, etc.) from 1580s. Related: Died; dies.
n.

early 14c. (as a plural, late 14c. as a singular), from Old French de “die, dice,” of uncertain origin. Common Romanic (cf. Spanish, Portuguese, Italian dado, Provençal dat, Catalan dau), perhaps from Latin datum “given,” past participle of dare (see date (n.1)), which, in addition to “give,” had a secondary sense of “to play” (as a chess piece); or else from “what is given” (by chance or Fortune). Sense of “stamping block or tool” first recorded 1690s.

die (dī)
v. died, dy·ing (dī’ĭng), dies

adjective

verb

noun

To desire very strongly: She was dying to become Miss Pancake (1591+)

verb

Related Terms

cross my heart

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Offenbach

    [aw-fuh n-bahk, of-uh n-; for 1 also French aw-fen-bak; for 2 also German awf-uh n-bahkh] /ˈɔ fənˌbɑk, ˈɒf ən-; for 1 also French ɔ fɛnˈbak; for 2 also German ˈɔf ənˌbɑx/ noun 1. Jacques [zhahk] /ʒɑk/ (Show IPA), 1819–80, French composer. 2. a city in S Hesse, in central Germany, on the Main River, near […]

  • Offence

    [uh-fens, aw-fens, of-ens] /əˈfɛns, ˈɔ fɛns, ˈɒf ɛns/ noun 1. . [uh-fens or for 7–9, aw-fens, of-ens] /əˈfɛns or for 7–9, ˈɔ fɛns, ˈɒf ɛns/ noun 1. a violation or breaking of a social or moral rule; transgression; sin. 2. a transgression of the law; misdemeanor. 3. a cause of transgression or wrong. 4. something […]



  • Offend

    [uh-fend] /əˈfɛnd/ verb (used with object) 1. to irritate, annoy, or anger; cause resentful displeasure in: Even the hint of prejudice offends me. 2. to affect (the sense, taste, etc.) disagreeably. 3. to violate or transgress (a criminal, religious, or moral law). 4. to hurt or cause pain to. 5. (in Biblical use) to cause […]

  • Offendable

    [uh-fend] /əˈfɛnd/ verb (used with object) 1. to irritate, annoy, or anger; cause resentful displeasure in: Even the hint of prejudice offends me. 2. to affect (the sense, taste, etc.) disagreeably. 3. to violate or transgress (a criminal, religious, or moral law). 4. to hurt or cause pain to. 5. (in Biblical use) to cause […]



Disclaimer: Offed definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.