On-the-road



noun
1.
a novel (1957) by Jack Kerouac.
[rohd] /roʊd/
noun
1.
a long, narrow stretch with a smoothed or paved surface, made for traveling by motor vehicle, carriage, etc., between two or more points; street or highway.
2.
a way or course:
the road to peace.
3.
a .
4.
Often, roads. Also called roadstead. Nautical. a partly sheltered area of water near a shore in which vessels may ride at anchor.
5.
Mining. any tunnel in a mine used for hauling.
6.
the road, the places, usually outside of New York City, at which theatrical companies on tour generally give performances.
Idioms
7.
burn up the road, Slang. to drive or move very fast.
8.
down the road, in the future:
Economists see higher interest rates down the road.
9.
hit the road, Slang. to begin or resume traveling:
We hit the road before sunrise.
10.
one for the road, a final alcoholic drink taken just before departing from a party, tavern, or the like.
11.
on the road,

12.
take to the road, to begin a journey or tour.
Also, take the road.
/rəʊd/
noun
1.

2.

3.

4.
a way, path, or course: the road to fame
5.
(often pl) (nautical) Also called roadstead. a partly sheltered anchorage
6.
a drift or tunnel in a mine, esp a level one
7.
(slang) hit the road, to start or resume travelling
8.
on the road

9.
take the road, take to the road, to begin a journey or tour
10.
(informal) one for the road, a last alcoholic drink before leaving
n.

Old English rad “riding expedition, journey, hostile incursion,” from Proto-Germanic *raido (cf. Old Frisian red “ride,” Old Saxon reda, Middle Dutch rede, Old High German reita “foray, raid”), from PIE *reidh- “to ride” (see ride (v.)). Also related to raid (n.). In Middle English, “a riding, a journey;” sense of “open way for traveling between two places” is first recorded 1590s. Meaning “narrow stretch of sheltered water” is from early 14c. (e.g. Hampton Roads in Virginia).

Modern spelling established 18c. In 19c. U.S. use, often meaning “railroad.” On the road “travelling” is from 1640s. Road test (n.) is from 1906; as a verb from 1937. Road hog is attested from 1886; road rage is from 1988. Road map is from 1786; road trip is by 1950, originally of baseball teams.

adverb phrase

Traveling from place to place with a show, musical program, etc (1870+ Show business)

modifier

Traveling; touring, itinerant: a road show (1900+ Theater)

Related Terms

go the hang-put road, hard-road freak, hit the road, let’s get the show on the road, one for the road, on the road, skid road, where the rubber meets the road, wide place in the road

(1 Sam. 27:10; R.V., “raid”), an inroad, an incursion. This word is never used in Scripture in the sense of a way or path.

1.
Traveling, as in Our salesmen are on the road five days a week. [ Mid-1600s ]
2.
on the road to. On the way to, following a course that will end in. For example, We could see Mary was on the road to recovery, or The business obviously was on the road to ruin. [ Mid-1600s ]

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