Orator



[awr-uh-ter, or-] /ˈɔr ə tər, ˈɒr-/

noun
1.
a person who delivers an ; a public speaker, especially one of great eloquence:
Demosthenes was one of the great orators of ancient Greece.
2.
Law. a plaintiff in a case in a court of equity.
/ˈɒrətə/
noun
1.
a public speaker, esp one versed in rhetoric
2.
a person given to lengthy or pompous speeches
3.
(obsolete) the claimant in a cause of action in chancery
n.

late 14c., “one who pleads or argues for a cause,” from Anglo-French oratour (Modern French orateur), from Latin orator “speaker,” from orare “to speak, speak before a court or assembly, pray, plead,” from PIE root *or- “to pronounce a ritual formula” (cf. Sanskrit aryanti “they praise,” Homeric Greek are, Attic ara “prayer,” Hittite ariya- “to ask the oracle,” aruwai- “to revere, worship”). Meaning “public speaker” is attested from early 15c.

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  • Oratorian

    [awr-uh-tawr-ee-uh n, -tohr-, or-] /ˌɔr əˈtɔr i ən, -ˈtoʊr-, ˌɒr-/ Roman Catholic Church noun 1. a member of an Oratory. adjective 2. of or relating to the Oratorians. /ˌɒrəˈtɔːrɪən/ noun 1. a member of the religious congregation of the Oratory

  • Oratorical

    [awr-uh-tawr-i-kuh l, or-uh-tor-] /ˌɔr əˈtɔr ɪ kəl, ˌɒr əˈtɒr-/ adjective 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of an or : His oratorical prowess has led to political success. 2. given to : an oratorical speaker. adj. 1580s, from orator or oratory + -ical, or else from Latin oratorius (see oratory (n.1)). Related: Oratorical; oratorically.



  • Oratorically

    [awr-uh-tawr-i-kuh l, or-uh-tor-] /ˌɔr əˈtɔr ɪ kəl, ˌɒr əˈtɒr-/ adjective 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of an or : His oratorical prowess has led to political success. 2. given to : an oratorical speaker. adj. 1580s, from orator or oratory + -ical, or else from Latin oratorius (see oratory (n.1)). Related: Oratorical; oratorically.

  • Oratorio

    [awr-uh-tawr-ee-oh, -tohr-, or-] /ˌɔr əˈtɔr iˌoʊ, -ˈtoʊr-, ˌɒr-/ noun, plural oratorios. 1. an extended musical composition with a text more or less dramatic in character and usually based upon a religious theme, for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra, and performed without action, costume, or scenery. /ˌɒrəˈtɔːrɪəʊ/ noun (pl) -rios 1. a dramatic but unstaged musical […]



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