Orbitary



[awr-bit] /ˈɔr bɪt/

noun
1.
the curved path, usually elliptical, described by a planet, satellite, spaceship, etc., around a celestial body, as the sun.
2.
the usual course of one’s life or range of one’s activities.
3.
the sphere of power or influence, as of a nation or person:
a small nation in the Russian orbit.
4.
Physics. (in Bohr theory) the path traced by an electron revolving around the nucleus of an atom.
5.
an orb or sphere.
6.
Anatomy.

7.
Zoology. the part surrounding the eye of a bird or insect.
verb (used with object)
8.
to move or travel around in an or elliptical path:
The earth orbits the sun once every 365.25 days.
9.
to send into orbit, as a satellite.
verb (used without object)
10.
to go or travel in an orbit.
/ˈɔːbɪt/
noun
1.
(astronomy) the curved path, usually elliptical, followed by a planet, satellite, comet, etc, in its motion around another celestial body under the influence of gravitation
2.
a range or field of action or influence; sphere: he is out of my orbit
3.
(anatomy) the bony cavity containing the eyeball Nontechnical name eye socket
4.
(zoology)

5.
(physics) the path of an electron in its motion around the nucleus of an atom
verb
6.
to move around (a body) in a curved path, usually circular or elliptical
7.
(transitive) to send (a satellite, spacecraft, etc) into orbit
8.
(intransitive) to move in or as if in an orbit
n.

late 14c., “the eye socket,” from Old French orbite or directly from Medieval Latin orbita, transferred use of Latin orbita “wheel track, beaten path, rut, course, orbit” (see orb). Astronomical sense first recorded 1690s in English; it was in classical Latin, revived in Gerard of Cremona’s translation of Avicenna.
v.

1946, from orbit (n.). Related: Orbited; orbiting.

orbit or·bit (ôr’bĭt)
n.
See orbital cavity.
orbit
(ôr’bĭt)
Noun

Verb

In astronomy, the path followed by an object revolving around another object, under the influence of gravitation (see satellite). In physics, the path followed by an electron within an atom. The planets follow elliptical orbits around the sun (see ellipse).

Note: Informally, something is “in orbit” when its actions are controlled by an external agency or force: “The countries of eastern Europe were once in the orbit of the Soviet Union.”

Related Terms

go into orbit, in orbit
see: in orbit

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  • Orbited

    [awr-bit] /ˈɔr bɪt/ noun 1. the curved path, usually elliptical, described by a planet, satellite, spaceship, etc., around a celestial body, as the sun. 2. the usual course of one’s life or range of one’s activities. 3. the sphere of power or influence, as of a nation or person: a small nation in the Russian […]

  • Orbiteer

    [awr-bi-teer] /ˌɔr bɪˈtɪər/ verb (used with object) 1. to climb (a mountain) in a circular fashion as opposed to scaling. verb (used without object) 2. to climb a mountain in this way.



  • Orbiter

    [awr-bi-ter] /ˈɔr bɪ tər/ noun, U.S. Aerospace. 1. Also called space shuttle orbiter. the crew- and payload-carrying component of the space shuttle. 2. a space probe designed to a planetary body or moon. /ˈɔːbɪtə/ noun 1. a spacecraft or satellite designed to orbit a planet or other body without landing on it Compare lander 954 […]

  • Orbiting

    [awr-bit] /ˈɔr bɪt/ noun 1. the curved path, usually elliptical, described by a planet, satellite, spaceship, etc., around a celestial body, as the sun. 2. the usual course of one’s life or range of one’s activities. 3. the sphere of power or influence, as of a nation or person: a small nation in the Russian […]



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