Overborrowing



[bor-oh, bawr-oh] /ˈbɒr oʊ, ˈbɔr oʊ/

verb (used with object)
1.
to take or obtain with the promise to return the same or an equivalent:
Our neighbor borrowed my lawn mower.
2.
to use, appropriate, or introduce from another source or from a foreign source:
to borrow an idea from the opposition; to borrow a word from French.
3.
Arithmetic. (in subtraction) to take from one denomination and add to the next lower.
verb (used without object)
4.
to borrow something:
Don’t borrow unless you intend to repay.
5.
Nautical.

6.
Golf. to putt on other than a direct line from the lie of the ball to the hole, to compensate for the incline or roll of the green.
Idioms
7.
borrow trouble, to do something that is unnecessary and may cause future harm or inconvenience.
/ˈbɒrəʊ/
verb
1.
to obtain or receive (something, such as money) on loan for temporary use, intending to give it, or something equivalent or identical, back to the lender
2.
to adopt (ideas, words, etc) from another source; appropriate
3.
(not standard) to lend
4.
(golf) to putt the ball uphill of the direct path to the hole
5.
(intransitive) (golf) (of a ball) to deviate from a straight path because of the slope of the ground
noun
6.
(golf) a deviation of a ball from a straight path because of the slope of the ground: a left borrow
7.
material dug from a borrow pit to provide fill at another
8.
living on borrowed time

/ˈbɒrəʊ/
noun
1.
George (Henry). 1803–81, English traveller and writer. His best-known works are the semiautobiographical novels of Gypsy life and language, Lavengro (1851) and its sequel The Romany Rye (1857)
v.

Old English borgian “to lend, be surety for,” from Proto-Germanic *borg “pledge” (cf. Old English borg “pledge, security, bail, debt,” Old Norse borga “to become bail for, guarantee,” Middle Dutch borghen “to protect, guarantee,” Old High German boragen “to beware of,” German borgen “to borrow; to lend”), from PIE *bhergh- “to hide, protect” (see bury). Sense shifted in Old English to “borrow,” apparently on the notion of collateral deposited as security for something borrowed. Related: Borrowed; borrowing.

The Israelites “borrowed” from the Egyptians (Ex. 12:35, R.V., “asked”) in accordance with a divine command (3:22; 11:2). But the word (sha’al) so rendered here means simply and always to “request” or “demand.” The Hebrew had another word which is properly translated “borrow” in Deut. 28:12; Ps. 37:21. It was well known that the parting was final. The Egyptians were so anxious to get the Israelites away out of their land that “they let them have what they asked” (Ex. 12:36, R.V.), or literally “made them to ask,” urged them to take whatever they desired and depart. (See LOAN.)

In addition to the idiom beginning with
borrow

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