Overtight



[tahyt] /taɪt/

adjective, tighter, tightest.
1.
firmly or closely fixed in place; not easily moved; secure:
a tight knot.
2.
drawn or stretched so as to be tense; taut.
3.
affording little or no extra room; fitting closely, especially too closely:
a tight collar.
4.
difficult to deal with or manage:
to be in a tight situation.
5.
of such close or compacted texture, or fitted together so closely, as to be impervious to water, air, steam, etc.:
a good, tight roof.
6.
concise; terse:
a tight style of writing.
7.
firm; rigid:
his tight control of the company.
8.
carefully arranged or organized and full; affording little leeway; compact:
a tight schedule.
9.
nearly even; close:
a tight race.
10.
Informal.

11.
parsimonious; stingy.
12.
Slang. drunk; tipsy.
13.
characterized by scarcity or eager demand; costly; limited; restricted:
a tight job market; tight money.
14.
Journalism. (of a newspaper) having more news available than is required for or utilizable in a particular issue.
15.
Baseball. (def 18).
16.
Scot. and North England. competent or skillful.
17.
.
18.
neatly or well built or made.
adverb, tighter, tightest.
19.
in a tight manner; closely; firmly; securely; tensely:
Shut the door tight. The shirt fit tight across the shoulders.
20.
soundly or deeply:
to sleep tight.
Idioms
21.
sit tight, to take no action.
/taɪt/
adjective
1.
stretched or drawn so as not to be loose; taut: a tight cord
2.
fitting or covering in a close manner: a tight dress
3.
held, made, fixed, or closed firmly and securely: a tight knot
4.

5.
unyielding or stringent: to keep a tight hold on resources
6.
cramped or constricted: a tight fit
7.
mean or miserly
8.
difficult and problematic: a tight situation
9.
hardly profitable: a tight bargain
10.
(economics)

11.
(of a match or game) very close or even
12.
(of a team or group, esp of a pop group) playing well together, in a disciplined coordinated way
13.
(informal) drunk
14.
(informal) (of a person) showing tension
15.
(archaic or dialect) neat
adverb
16.
in a close, firm, or secure way: pull it tight
17.
sit tight

18.
sleep tight, to sleep soundly
adj.

mid-15c., “dense, close, compact,” from Middle English thight, from Old Norse þettr “watertight, close in texture, solid,” from Proto-Germanic *thenkhtuz (cf. second element in Old English meteþiht “stout from eating;” Middle High German dihte “dense, thick,” German dicht “dense, tight,” Old High German gidigan, German gediegen “genuine, solid, worthy”), from PIE root *tenk- “to become firm, curdle, thicken” (cf. Irish techt “curdled, coagulated,” Lithuanian tankus “close, tight,” Persian tang “tight,” Sanskrit tanakti “draws together, contracts”).

Sense of “drawn, stretched” is from 1570s; meaning “fitting closely” (as of garments) is from 1779; that of “evenly matched” (of a contest, bargain, etc.) is from 1828, American English; that of “drunk” is from 1830; that of “close, sympathetic” is from 1956. Tight-assed “unwilling to relax” is attested from 1903. Tight-laced is recorded from 1741 in both the literal and figurative senses. Tight-lipped is first attested 1876.

adjective

Related Terms

sit tight

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