Oxford



[oks-ferd] /ˈɒks fərd/

noun
1.
Also called Oxford shoe, Oxford tie. a low shoe laced over the instep.
2.
Also called oxford cloth. a cotton or synthetic fabric, in plain, twill, or basket weave, constructed on a pattern of two fine yarns woven as one warpwise and one loosely twisted yarn weftwise, for shirts, skirts, and summer sportswear.
[oks-ferd] /ˈɒks fərd/
noun
1.
1st Earl of, .
2.
a city in S , in S England, NW of London: university, founded in 12th century.
3.
.
4.
a town in SW Ohio.
5.
a town in S Massachusetts.
6.
a town in N Mississippi, hometown of William Faulkner.
7.
Also called Oxford Down. one of an English breed of large, hornless sheep, noted for its market lambs and heavy fleece of medium length.
/ˈɒksfəd/
noun
1.
a city in S England, administrative centre of Oxfordshire, at the confluence of the Rivers Thames and Cherwell: Royalist headquarters during the Civil War; seat of Oxford University, consisting of 40 separate colleges, the oldest being University College (1249), and Oxford Brookes University (1993); motor-vehicle industry. Pop: 143 016 (2001) related word Oxonian
2.
Also called Oxford Down. a breed of sheep with middle-length wool and a dark brown face and legs
3.
a type of stout laced shoe with a low heel
4.
a lightweight fabric of plain or twill weave used esp for men’s shirts
/ˈɒksfəd/
noun
1.
1st Earl of. title of (Robert) Harley

university town in England, Middle English Oxforde, from Old English Oxnaforda (10c.) literally “where the oxen ford.” In reference to a type of shoe laced over the instep, it is attested from 1721 (Oxford-cut shoes). Related: Oxfordian; Oxfordish; Oxfordist; Oxfordy.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Oxford accent

    noun 1. the accent associated with Oxford English

  • Oxford and cambridge universities

    The famed “ancient universities” of England, dating back to the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Oxford and Cambridge have long held a commanding position in English education, and their graduates have often gained eminence in public life. Note: The names of these two universities are sometimes merged into “Oxbridge.”



  • Oxford bags

    plural noun 1. trousers with very wide baggy legs, originally popular in the 1920s Often shortened to bags

  • Oxford comma

    noun 1. a comma between the final items in a list, often preceding the word `and’ or `or’, such as the final comma in the list newspapers, magazines, and books noun See serial comma



Disclaimer: Oxford definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.