Pawner



[pawn] /pɔn/

verb (used with object)
1.
to deposit as security, as for money borrowed, especially with a :
He raised the money by pawning his watch.
2.
to pledge; stake; risk:
to pawn one’s life.
noun
3.
the state of being deposited or held as security, especially with or by a :
jewels in pawn.
4.
something given or deposited as security, as for money borrowed.
5.
a person serving as security; hostage.
6.
the act of pawning.
/pɔːn/
verb (transitive)
1.
to deposit (an article) as security for the repayment of a loan, esp from a pawnbroker
2.
to stake: to pawn one’s honour
noun
3.
an article deposited as security
4.
the condition of being so deposited (esp in the phrase in pawn)
5.
a person or thing that is held as a security, esp a hostage
6.
the act of pawning
/pɔːn/
noun
1.
a chessman of the lowest theoretical value, limited to forward moves of one square at a time with the option of two squares on its initial move: it captures with a diagonal move only P Compare piece (sense 12)
2.
a person, group, etc, manipulated by another
n.

“something left as security,” late 15c. (mid-12c. as Anglo-Latin pandum), from Old French pan, pant “pledge, security,” also “booty, plunder,” perhaps from Frankish or some other Germanic source (cf. Old High German pfant, German Pfand, Middle Dutch pant, Old Frisian pand “pledge”), from West Germanic *panda, of unknown origin.

The Old French word is identical to pan “cloth, piece of cloth,” from Latin pannum (nominative pannus) “cloth, piece of cloth, garment” and Klein’s sources feel this is the source of both the Old French and West Germanic words (perhaps on the notion of cloth used as a medium of exchange).

lowly chess piece, late 14c., from Anglo-French poun, Old French peon, earlier pehon, from Medieval Latin pedonem “foot soldier,” from Late Latin pedonem (nominative pedo) “one going on foot,” from Latin pes (genitive pedis) “foot” (see foot (n.)). The chess sense was in Old French by 13c. Figurative use, of persons, is from 1580s.
v.

“to give (something) as security in exchange for,” 1560s, from pawn (n.1). Related: Pawned; pawning.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Pawn off

    Dispose of by deception, as in They tried to pawn off a rebuilt computer as new . This expression may have originated as a corruption of palm off , although it was also put as pawn upon in the 1700s, when it originated.

  • Pawning

    [pawn] /pɔn/ verb (used with object) 1. to deposit as security, as for money borrowed, especially with a : He raised the money by pawning his watch. 2. to pledge; stake; risk: to pawn one’s life. noun 3. the state of being deposited or held as security, especially with or by a : jewels in […]



  • Pawnshop

    [pawn-shop] /ˈpɔnˌʃɒp/ noun 1. the of a pawnbroker, especially one where unredeemed items are displayed and sold. /ˈpɔːnˌʃɒp/ noun 1. the premises of a pawnbroker n. also pawn-shop, by 1763, from pawn (n.1) + shop (n.).

  • Pawn-ticket

    noun 1. a receipt given for goods left with a pawnbroker. noun 1. a receipt for goods pawned



Disclaimer: Pawner definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.