Peelable



[peel] /pil/

verb (used with object)
1.
to strip (something) of its skin, rind, bark, etc.:
to peel an orange.
2.
to strip (the skin, rind, bark, paint, etc.) from something:
to peel paint from a car.
3.
Croquet. to cause (another player’s ball) to go through a wicket.
verb (used without object)
4.
(of skin, bark, paint, etc.) to come off; become separated.
5.
to lose the skin, rind, bark, paint, etc.
6.
Informal. to undress.
7.
Metallurgy. (of a malleable iron casting) to lose, or tend to lose, the outer layer.
noun
8.
the skin or rind of a fruit, vegetable, etc.
9.
Metallurgy. the presence of a brittle outer layer on a malleable iron casting.
Verb phrases
10.
peel off,

Idioms
11.
keep one’s eyes peeled, Informal. to watch closely or carefully; be alert:
Keep your eyes peeled for a gas station.
/piːl/
verb
1.
(transitive) to remove (the skin, rind, outer covering, etc) of (a fruit, egg, etc)
2.
(intransitive) (of paint, etc) to be removed from a surface, esp through weathering
3.
(intransitive) (of a surface) to lose its outer covering of paint, etc esp through weathering
4.
(intransitive) (of a person or part of the body) to shed skin in flakes or (of skin) to be shed in flakes, esp as a result of sunburn
5.
(croquet) to put (another player’s ball) through a hoop or hoops
6.
keep one’s eyes peeled, keep one’s eyes skinned, to watch vigilantly
noun
7.
the skin or rind of a fruit, etc
/piːl/
noun
1.
a long-handled shovel used by bakers for moving bread, in an oven
/piːl/
noun
1.
(in Britain) a fortified tower of the 16th century on the borders between England and Scotland, built to withstand raids
/piːl/
noun
1.
John, real name John Robert Parker Ravenscroft. 1939–2004, British broadcaster; presented his influential Radio 1 music programme (1967–2004) and Radio 4’s Home Truths (1998–2004)
2.
Sir Robert. 1788–1850, British statesman; Conservative prime minister (1834–35; 1841–46). As Home Secretary (1828–30) he founded the Metropolitan Police and in his second ministry carried through a series of free-trade budgets culminating in the repeal of the Corn Laws (1846), which split the Tory party
noun

See baker’s peel
v.

“to strip off,” developed from Old English pilian “to peel, skin, decorticate, strip the skin or ring,” and Old French pillier, both from Latin pilare “to strip of hair,” from pilus “hair” (see pile (n.3)). Probably also influenced by Latin pellis “skin, hide.” Related: Peeled; peeling. Figurative expression keep (one’s) eyes peeled be observant, be on the alert” is from 1853, American English.
n.

piece of rind or skin, 1580s, from earlier pill, pile (late 14c.), from peel (v.)).

“shovel-shaped instrument” used by bakers, etc., c.1400, from Old French pele (Modern French pelle) “shovel,” from Latin pala “spade, shovel, baker’s peel,” of unknown origin.

verb

In addition to the idiom beginning with peel

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    [peel] /pil/ verb (used with object) 1. to strip (something) of its skin, rind, bark, etc.: to peel an orange. 2. to strip (the skin, rind, bark, paint, etc.) from something: to peel paint from a car. 3. Croquet. to cause (another player’s ball) to go through a wicket. verb (used without object) 4. (of […]

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