Pitching



[pich-ing] /ˈpɪtʃ ɪŋ/

noun
1.
the act of revetting or paving with small stones.
2.
stones so used.
[pich] /pɪtʃ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to erect or set up (a tent, camp, or the like).
2.
to put, set, or plant in a fixed or definite place or position.
3.
to throw, fling, hurl, or toss.
4.
Baseball.

5.
to set at a certain point, degree, level, etc.:
He pitched his hopes too high.
6.
Music. to set at a particular pitch, or determine the key or keynote of (a melody).
7.
Cards.

8.
to pave or revet with small stones.
9.
Masonry.

10.
Informal. to attempt to sell or win approval for; promote; advertise:
to pitch breakfast foods at a sales convention.
11.
Informal. to approach or court (as a person, company, or the public) in hope of a sale, approval, or interest; make an appeal to.
12.
to cause to pitch.
13.
Obsolete. to set in order; to arrange, as a field of battle.
14.
Obsolete. to fix firmly as in the ground; embed.
verb (used without object)
15.
to plunge or fall forward or headlong.
16.
to lurch.
17.
to throw or toss.
18.
Baseball.

19.
to slope downward; dip.
20.
to plunge with alternate fall and rise of bow and stern, as a ship (opposed to ).
21.
(of a rocket or guided missile) to deviate from a stable flight attitude by oscillations of the longitudinal axis in a vertical plane about the center of gravity.
22.
to fix a tent or temporary habitation; encamp:
They pitched by a mountain stream.
23.
Golf. to play a pitch shot.
24.
Informal. to attempt to sell or win approval for something or someone by advertising, promotion, etc.:
politicians pitching on TV.
25.
Rare. to become established; settle down.
noun
26.
relative point, position, or degree:
a high pitch of excitement.
27.
the degree of inclination or slope; angle:
the pitch of an arch; the pitch of a stair.
28.
the highest point or greatest height:
enjoying the pitch of success.
29.
(in music, speech, etc.) the degree of height or depth of a tone or of sound, depending upon the relative rapidity of the vibrations by which it is produced.
30.
Music. the particular tonal standard with which given tones may be compared in respect to their relative level.
31.
Acoustics. the apparent predominant frequency sounded by an acoustical source.
32.
act or manner of pitching.
33.
a throw or toss.
34.
Baseball. the serving of the ball to the batter by the pitcher, usually preceded by a windup or stretch.
35.
a pitching movement or forward plunge, as of a ship.
36.
upward or downward inclination or slope:
a road descending at a steep pitch.
37.
a sloping part or place:
to build on the pitch of a hill.
38.
a quantity of something pitched or placed somewhere.
39.
Cricket. the central part of the field; the area between the wickets.
40.
Informal.

41.
the specific location in which a person or object is placed or stationed; allotted or assigned place.
42.
Chiefly British. the established location, often a street corner, of a beggar, street peddler, newspaper vendor, etc.
43.
Aeronautics.

44.

45.
Also called plunge. Geology. the inclination of a linear feature, as the axis of a fold or an oreshoot, from the horizontal.
46.
Machinery.

47.
(in carpet weaving) the weftwise number of warp ends, usually determined in relation to 27 inches (68.6 cm).
48.
Cards.

49.
Masonry. a true or even surface on a stone.
50.
(of typewriter type) a unit of measurement indicating the number of characters to a horizontal inch:
Pica is a 10-pitch type.
Verb phrases
51.
pitch in, Informal.

52.
pitch into, Informal.

53.
pitch on/upon, to choose, especially casually or without forethought; decide on:
We pitched on a day for our picnic.
[pich] /pɪtʃ/
noun
1.
any of various dark, tenacious, and viscous substances for caulking and paving, consisting of the residue of the distillation of coal tar or wood tar.
2.
any of certain bitumens, as asphalt:
mineral pitch.
3.
any of various resins.
4.
the sap or crude turpentine that exudes from the bark of pines.
verb (used with object)
5.
to smear or cover with pitch.
/pɪtʃ/
verb
1.
to hurl or throw (something); cast; fling
2.
(usually transitive) to set up (a camp, tent, etc)
3.
(transitive) to place or thrust (a stake, spear, etc) into the ground
4.
(intransitive) to move vigorously or irregularly to and fro or up and down
5.
(transitive) to aim or fix (something) at a particular level, position, style, etc: if you advertise privately you may pitch the price too low
6.
(transitive) to aim to sell (a product) to a specified market or on a specified basis
7.
(intransitive) to slope downwards
8.
(intransitive) to fall forwards or downwards
9.
(intransitive) (of a vessel) to dip and raise its bow and stern alternately
10.
(cricket) to bowl (a ball) so that it bounces on a certain part of the wicket, or (of a ball) to bounce on a certain part of the wicket
11.
(intransitive) (of a missile, aircraft, etc) to deviate from a stable flight attitude by movement of the longitudinal axis about the lateral axis Compare yaw (sense 1), roll (sense 14)
12.
(transitive) (in golf) to hit (a ball) steeply into the air, esp with backspin to minimize roll
13.
(transitive) (music)

14.
(transitive) (cards) to lead (a suit) and so determine trumps for that trick
15.
(baseball)

16.
(Southwest English, dialect) used with it as subject. to snow without the settled snow melting
17.
(US & Canadian, informal) in there pitching, taking part with enthusiasm
18.
pitch a tale, pitch a yarn, to tell a story, usually of a fantastic nature
noun
19.
the degree of elevation or depression
20.

21.
the extreme height or depth
22.
(mountaineering) a section of a route between two belay points, sometimes equal to the full length of the rope but often shorter
23.
the degree of slope of a roof, esp when expressed as a ratio of height to span
24.
the distance between corresponding points on adjacent members of a body of regular form, esp the distance between teeth on a gearwheel or between threads on a screw thread
25.
the distance between regularly spaced objects such as rivets, bolts, etc
26.
the pitching motion of a ship, missile, etc
27.

28.
the distance between the back rest of a seat in a passenger aircraft and the back of the seat in front of it
29.
(music)

30.
(cricket) the rectangular area between the stumps, 22 yards long and 10 feet wide; the wicket
31.
(geology) the inclination of the axis of an anticline or syncline or of a stratum or vein from the horizontal
32.
another name for seven-up
33.
the act or manner of pitching a ball, as in cricket
34.
(mainly Brit) a vendor’s station, esp on a pavement
35.
(slang) a persuasive sales talk, esp one routinely repeated
36.
(mainly Brit) (in many sports) the field of play
37.
(golf) Also called pitch shot. an approach shot in which the ball is struck in a high arc
38.
(US & Canadian, slang) make a pitch for

39.
(Brit, informal) queer someone’s pitch, to upset someone’s plans
/pɪtʃ/
noun
1.
any of various heavy dark viscid substances obtained as a residue from the distillation of tars See also coal-tar pitch
2.
any of various similar substances, such as asphalt, occurring as natural deposits
3.
any of various similar substances obtained by distilling certain organic substances so that they are incompletely carbonized
4.
crude turpentine obtained as sap from pine trees related adjective piceous
verb
5.
(transitive) to apply pitch to (something)
v.

c.1200, “to thrust in, fasten, settle,” probably from an unrecorded Old English *piccean, related to prick (v.). The original past tense was pight. Sense of “set upright,” as in pitch a tent (late 13c.), is from notion of “driving in” the pegs. Meaning to incline forward and downward” is from 1510s. Meaning “throw (a ball)” evolved late 14c. from that of “hit the mark.” Musical sense is from 1670s. Of ships, “to plunge” in the waves, 1620s. To pitch in “work vigorously” is from 1847, perhaps from farm labor. Related: Pitched; pitching.

“to cover with pitch,” Old English pician, from the source of pitch (n.2).
n.

1520s, “something that is pitched,” from pitch (v.1). Meaning “act of throwing” is attested from 1833. Meaning “act of plunging headfirst” is from 1762; sense of “slope, degree, inclination” is from 1540s; musical sense is from 1590s; but the connection of these is obscure. Sales pitch in the modern commercial advertising sense is from 1943, American English, perhaps from the baseball sense.

“resinous substance, wood tar,” late 12c., pich, from Old English pic “pitch,” from a Germanic borrowing (cf. Old Saxon and Old Frisian pik, Middle Dutch pik, Dutch pek, Old High German pek, German Pech, Old Norse bik) from Latin pix (genitive picis) “pitch,” from PIE root *pi- “sap, juice” (cf. Greek pissa, Lithuanian pikis, Old Church Slavonic piklu “pitch;” see pine (n.)). Applied to pine resins from late 14c. Pitch-black is attested from 1590s; pitch-dark from 1680s.
pitch
(pĭch)

Related Terms

in there pitching

noun

verb

Related Terms

butterfly ball, in there pitching, make a pitch, throw

(Gen. 6:14), asphalt or bitumen in its soft state, called “slime” (Gen. 11:3; 14:10; Ex. 2:3), found in pits near the Dead Sea (q.v.). It was used for various purposes, as the coating of the outside of vessels and in building. Allusion is made in Isa. 34:9 to its inflammable character. (See SLIME.)

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