Pokable



[pohk] /poʊk/

verb (used with object), poked, poking.
1.
to prod or push, especially with something narrow or pointed, as a finger, elbow, stick, etc.:
to poke someone in the ribs.
2.
to make (a hole, one’s way, etc.) by or as by prodding or pushing.
3.
to thrust or push:
She poked her head out of the window.
4.
to force, drive, or stir by or as by pushing or thrusting:
He poked the fire up.
5.
to thrust obtrusively:
The prosecutor kept poking his finger at the defendant.
verb (used without object), poked, poking.
6.
to make a pushing or thrusting movement with the finger, a stick, etc.
7.
to extend or project (often followed by out):
His handkerchief is poking out of his back pocket.
8.
to thrust oneself obtrusively:
to poke into something that is not one’s affair.
9.
to search curiously; pry (often followed by around or about).
10.
to go or proceed in a slow or aimless way (often followed by along).
noun
11.
a thrust or push.
12.
Informal. a slow or dawdling person; .
Idioms
13.
poke fun at, to ridicule or mock, especially covertly or slyly:
In her novel, she pokes fun at her ex-husband.
14.
poke one’s nose into, Informal. to meddle in; pry into:
We felt as if half the people in town were poking their noses into our lives.
/pəʊk/
verb
1.
(transitive) to jab or prod, as with the elbow, the finger, a stick, etc
2.
(transitive) to make (a hole, opening, etc) by or as by poking
3.
when intr, often foll by at. to thrust (at)
4.
(transitive) (informal) to hit with the fist; punch
5.
usually foll by in, out, out of, through, etc. to protrude or cause to protrude: don’t poke your arm out of the window
6.
(transitive) to stir (a fire, pot, etc) by poking
7.
(intransitive) to meddle or intrude
8.
(intransitive; often foll by about or around) to search or pry
9.
(intransitive) often foll by along. to loiter, potter, dawdle, etc
10.
(transitive) (slang) (of a man) to have sexual intercourse with
11.
poke fun at, to mock or ridicule
12.
poke one’s nose into, See nose (sense 17)
noun
13.
a jab or prod
14.
short for slowpoke
15.
(informal) a blow with one’s fist; punch
16.
(slang) sexual intercourse
/pəʊk/
noun
1.
(dialect) a pocket or bag
2.
a pig in a poke, See pig (sense 9)
/pəʊk/
noun
1.
Also called poke bonnet. a woman’s bonnet with a brim that projects at the front, popular in the 18th and 19th centuries
2.
the brim itself
/pəʊk/
noun
1.
short for pokeweed
v.

“to push, prod, thrust,” especially with something pointed, c.1300, puken “to poke, nudge,” of uncertain origin, perhaps from or related to Middle Dutch poken “to poke” (Dutch beuken), or Middle Low German poken “to stick with a knife” (cf. German pochen “to knock, rap”), both from Proto-Germanic root *puk-, perhaps imitative. Related: Poked; poking. To poke fun “tease” first attested 1840; to poke around “search” is from 1809. To poke along “advance lazily; walk at a leisurely pace” is from 1833.
n.

“small sack,” early 13c., probably from Old North French poque (12c., Old French poche) “purse, poke, purse-net,” probably from a Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *puk- (cf. Old English pohha, pocca “bag, pocket,” Middle Dutch poke, Old Norse poki “bag, pouch, pocket,” dialectal German Pfoch), from PIE root *beu-, an imitative root associated with words for “to swell” (see bull (n.2)).

“pokeweed; a weed used in medicine and dyeing,” colonial American, from native words, possibly a confusion of similar-sounding Native American plant names; from 1630s in English as “tobacco plant,” short for uppowoc (1580s), from Algonquian (Virginia) *uppowoc. Later (1708) the word is used in the sense “pokeweed,” as a shortened form of puccoon, from Algonquian (Virginia) *puccoon, name of a plant used for dyeing.” Native roots for “smoke” and “stain” have been proposed as the origin or origins.

“an act of poking,” 1796, originally pugilistic slang, from poke (v.). Also (1809) the name of a device, like a yoke with a pole, attached to domestic animals such as pigs and sheep to keep them from escaping enclosures. Hence slowpoke, and cf. pokey. Slang sense “act of sexual intercourse” is attested from 1902.

noun

verb

Related Terms

buy a pig in a poke, cowpuncher

noun

[fr Southern dialect, ”pocket, bag,” fr Middle English, ultimately fr Old Norman French]

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