Polished



[pol-isht] /ˈpɒl ɪʃt/

adjective
1.
made smooth and glossy:
a figurine of polished mahogany.
2.
naturally smooth and glossy:
polished pebbles on the beach.
3.
refined, cultured, or elegant:
a polished manner.
4.
flawless; skillful; excellent:
a polished conversationalist.
[pol-ish] /ˈpɒl ɪʃ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to make smooth and glossy, especially by rubbing or friction:
to polish a brass doorknob.
2.
to render finished, refined, or elegant:
His speech needs polishing.
verb (used without object)
3.
to become smooth and glossy through polishing:
a flooring that polishes easily.
4.
Archaic. to become refined or elegant.
noun
5.
a substance used to give smoothness or gloss:
shoe polish.
6.
the act of polishing.
7.
state of being polished.
8.
smoothness and gloss of surface.
9.
superiority of manner or execution; refinement; elegance:
the polish of a professional singer.
Verb phrases
10.
polish off, Informal.

11.
polish up, to improve; refine:
She took lessons to polish up her speech.
/ˈpɒlɪʃt/
adjective
1.
accomplished: a polished actor
2.
impeccably or professionally done: a polished performance
3.
(of rice) having had the outer husk removed by milling
/ˈpɒlɪʃ/
verb
1.
to make or become smooth and shiny by rubbing, esp with wax or an abrasive
2.
(transitive) to make perfect or complete
3.
to make or become elegant or refined
noun
4.
a finish or gloss
5.
the act of polishing or the condition of having been polished
6.
a substance used to produce a smooth and shiny, often protective surface
7.
elegance or refinement, esp in style, manner, etc
/ˈpəʊlɪʃ/
adjective
1.
of, relating to, or characteristic of Poland, its people, or their language
noun
2.
the official language of Poland, belonging to the West Slavonic branch of the Indo-European family
adj.

late 14c., “made smooth;” early 15c., “elegant;” past participle adjective from polish (v.).
v.

early 14c., polischen “make smooth,” from Old French poliss-, present participle stem of polir (12c.) “to polish, decorate, see to one’s appearance,” from Latin polire “to polish, make smooth; decorate, embellish;” figuratively “refine, improve,” said to be from Proto-Indo-European *pel- “to thrust, strike, drive” (via the notion of fulling cloth). The sense of “free from coarseness, to refine” first recorded in English mid-14c. Related: Polished; polishing. Slang polish off “finish” is 1837, from notion of applying a coat of polish being the final step in a piece of work.
n.

1590s, “absence of coarseness,” from polish (v.). From 1704 as “act of polishing;” 1819 as “substance used in polishing.”
adj.

1670s, from Pole + -ish. Related: Polishness. Polish-American attested from 1898.

Related Terms

is the pope polish

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