Port



[pawrt, pohrt] /pɔrt, poʊrt/

noun
1.
a city, town, or other place where ships load or unload.
2.
a place along a coast in which ships may take refuge from storms; harbor.
3.
Also called port of entry. Law. any place where persons and merchandise are allowed to pass, by water or land, into and out of a country and where customs officers are stationed to inspect or appraise imported goods.
4.
a geographical area that forms a harbor:
the largest port on the eastern seaboard.
5.
Informal. an .
[pawrt, pohrt] /pɔrt, poʊrt/
noun
1.
the left-hand side of a vessel or aircraft, facing forward.
adjective
2.
pertaining to or designating port.
3.
located on the left side of a vessel or aircraft.
verb (used with or without object)
4.
to turn or shift to the port, or left, side.
[pawrt, pohrt] /pɔrt, poʊrt/
noun
1.
any of a class of very sweet wines, mostly dark-red, originally from Portugal.
[pawrt, pohrt] /pɔrt, poʊrt/
noun
1.
an opening in the side or other exterior part of a ship for admitting air and light or for taking on cargo.
Compare (def 1).
2.
Machinery. an aperture in the surface of a cylinder, for the passage of steam, air, water, etc.
3.
a small aperture in an armored vehicle, aircraft, or fortification through which a gun can be fired or a camera directed.
4.
Computers.

5.
the raised center portion on a bit for horses.
6.
Chiefly Scot. a gate or , as to a town or fortress.
[pawrt, pohrt] /pɔrt, poʊrt/
verb (used with object)
1.
Military. to carry (a rifle or other weapon) with both hands, in a slanting direction across the front of the body, with the barrel or like part near the left shoulder.
2.
Digital Technology. to create a new version of (an application program) to run on a different hardware platform (sometimes followed by over):
The publisher is porting several classic games to next-generation consoles.
noun
3.
Military. the position of a rifle or other weapon when ported.
4.
Digital Technology. a version of an existing video game published for a different console or device.
5.
Archaic. manner of bearing oneself; carriage or deportment.
1.
.
2.
.
/pɔːt/
noun
1.
a town or place alongside navigable water with facilities for the loading and unloading of ships
2.
See port of entry
/pɔːt/
noun
1.
Also called (formerly) larboard

verb
2.
to turn or be turned towards the port
/pɔːt/
noun
1.
a sweet fortified dessert wine
/pɔːt/
noun
1.
(nautical)

2.
a small opening in a wall, armoured vehicle, etc, for firing through
3.
an aperture, esp one controlled by a valve, by which fluid enters or leaves the cylinder head of an engine, compressor, etc
4.
(electronics) a logic circuit for the input and ouput of data
5.
(mainly Scot) a gate or portal in a town or fortress
/pɔːt/
verb
1.
(transitive) to carry (a rifle, etc) in a position diagonally across the body with the muzzle near the left shoulder
noun
2.
this position
/pɔːt/
verb
1.
(transitive) (computing) to change (programs) from one system to another
/pɔːt/
noun
1.
(Austral) (esp in Queensland) a suitcase or school case
abbreviation
1.
Portugal
2.
Portuguese
n.

“harbor,” Old English port “harbor, haven,” reinforced by Old French port “harbor, port; mountain pass;” Old English and Old French words both from Latin portus “port, harbor,” originally “entrance, passage,” figuratively “place of refuge, assylum,” from PIE *prtu- “a going, a passage,” from root *per- (2) “to lead, pass over” (cf. Sanskrit parayati “carries over;” Greek poros “journey, passage, way,” peirein “to pierce, run through;” Latin porta “gate, door,” portare “passage,” peritus “experienced;” Avestan peretush “passage, ford, bridge;” Armenian hordan “go forward;” Welsh rhyd “ford;” Old Church Slavonic pariti “to fly;” Old English faran “to go, journey,” Old Norse fjörðr “inlet, estuary”).

Meaning “left side of a ship” (looking forward from the stern) is attested from 1540s, from notion of “the side facing the harbor” (when a ship is docked). It replaced larboard in common usage to avoid confusion with starboard; officially so by Admiralty order of 1844 and U.S. Navy Department notice of 1846. Figurative sense “place of refuge” is attested from early 15c.; phrase any port in a storm first recorded 1749. A port of call (1810) is one paid a scheduled visit by a ship.

“gateway,” Old English port “portal, door, gate, entrance,” from Old French porte “gate, entrance,” from Latin porta “city gate, gate; door, entrance,” from PIE root *per- (see port (n.1)). Specific meaning “porthole, opening in the side of a ship” is attested from c.1300.

“bearing, mien,” c.1300, from Old French port, from porter “to carry,” from Latin portare (see port (n.1)).

type of sweet dark-red wine, 1690s, shortened from Oporto, city in northwest Portugal from which the wine originally was shipped to England; from O Porto “the port;” (see port (n.1)).
v.

“to carry,” from Middle French porter, from Latin portare “to carry” (see port (n.1)). Related: Ported; porting.
port
(pôrt)

1. A logical channel or channel endpoint in a communications system. The Transmission Control Protocol and User Datagram Protocol transport layer protocols used on Ethernet use port numbers to distinguish between (demultiplex) different logical channels on the same network interface on a computer.
Each application program has a unique port number associated with it, defined in /etc/services or the Network Information Service “services” database. Some protocols, e.g. telnet and HTTP (which is actually a special form of telnet) have default ports specified as above but can use other ports as well.
Some port numbers are defined in RFC 3232 (which replaces RFC 1700). Ports are now divided into: “Well Known” or “Privileged”, and “Ephemeral” or “Unprivileged” (comprising “Registered”, “Dynamic”, “Private”).
(2004-12-30)
2. To translate or modify software to run on a different platform, or the results of doing so. The portability of the software determines how easy it is to port.
3. An imperative language descended from Zed from Waterloo Microsystems (now Hayes Canada) ca. 1979.
[“Port Language” document in the Waterloo Port Development System].
(2002-06-19)
1.
portable
2.
portrait
1.
Portugal
2.
Portuguese
see: any port in a storm

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Portabella

    [pawr-tuh-bel-uh] /ˌpɔr təˈbɛl ə/ noun 1. a very large, rich-flavored cremini mushroom, often grilled, broiled, or sautéed.

  • Porta

    /ˈpɔːtə/ noun 1. (anatomy) an aperture in an organ, such as the liver, esp one providing an opening for blood vessels porta por·ta (pôr’tə) n. pl. por·tae (-tē)



  • Portability

    [pawr-tuh-bil-i-tee, pohr-] /ˌpɔr təˈbɪl ɪ ti, ˌpoʊr-/ noun, plural portabilities for 2. 1. the state or quality of being . 2. a plan or system under which employees may accumulate pension rights under any employer who is a participant in the plan negotiated with their union. operating system, programming The ease with which a piece […]

  • Portable

    [pawr-tuh-buh l, pohr-] /ˈpɔr tə bəl, ˈpoʊr-/ adjective 1. capable of being transported or conveyed: a portable stage. 2. easily carried or conveyed by hand: a portable typewriter. 3. Computers. (of data sets, software, etc.) capable of being used on different computer systems. 4. Obsolete. . noun 5. something that is portable, especially as distinguished […]



Disclaimer: Port definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.