Pulse



[puhls] /pʌls/

noun
1.
the regular throbbing of the arteries, caused by the successive contractions of the heart, especially as may be felt at an artery, as at the wrist.
2.
a single , or beat or throb, of the arteries or heart.
3.
the rhythmic recurrence of strokes, vibrations, or undulations.
4.
a single stroke, vibration, or undulation.
5.
Electricity. a momentary, sudden fluctuation in an electrical quantity, as in voltage or current.
6.
Physics. a single, abrupt emission of particles or radiation.
7.
a throb of life, emotion, etc.
8.
.
9.
the general attitude, sentiment, preference, etc., as of the public.
verb (used without object), pulsed, pulsing.
10.
to beat or throb; .
11.
to beat, vibrate, or undulate.
12.
Physics. to emit particles or radiation periodically in short bursts.
verb (used with object), pulsed, pulsing.
13.
to cause to pulse.
14.
Medicine/Medical. to administer (medication) in interrupted, often concentrated dosages to avoid unwanted side effects.
[puhls] /pʌls/
noun
1.
the edible seeds of certain leguminous plants, as peas, beans, or lentils.
2.
a plant producing such seeds.
/pʌls/
noun
1.
(physiol)

2.
(physics, electronics)

3.

4.
bustle, vitality, or excitement: the pulse of a city
5.
the feelings or thoughts of a group or society as they can be measured: the pulse of the voters
6.
keep one’s finger on the pulse, to be well-informed about current events
verb
7.
(intransitive) to beat, throb, or vibrate
8.
(transitive) to provide an electronic pulse to operate (a slide projector)
/pʌls/
noun
1.
the edible seeds of any of several leguminous plants, such as peas, beans, and lentils
2.
the plant producing any of these seeds
n.

“a throb, a beat,” early 14c., from Old French pous, pulse (late 12c., Modern French pouls) and directly from Latin pulsus (in pulsus venarum “beating from the blood in the veins”), past participle of pellere “to push, drive,” from PIE *pel- (6) “to thrust, strike, drive” (cf. Greek pallein “to wield, brandish, swing,” pelemizein “to shake, cause to tremble”). Extended usages from 16c. Figurative use for “life, vitality, essential energy” is from 1530s.

“peas, beans, lentils,” late 13c., from Old French pouls, pols and directly from Latin puls “thick gruel, porridge, mush,” probably via Etruscan, from Greek poltos “porridge” made from flour, from PIE *pel- (1) “dust, flour” (see pollen; also cf. poultice).
v.

“to beat, throb,” early 15c., from pulse (n.1) or else from Latin pulsare “to beat, throb,” and in part from French. Related: Pulsed; pulsing.

pulse (pŭls)
n.
The rhythmical dilation of arteries produced when blood is pumped outward by regular contractions of the heart, especially as palpated at the wrist or in the neck.
pulse
(pŭls)

(Dan. 1:12, 16), R.V. “herbs,” vegetable food in general.

see: take the pulse of

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  • Pulse-amplitude modulation

    [puhls-am-pli-tood, -tyood] /ˈpʌlsˈæm plɪˌtud, -ˌtyud/ noun, Telecommunications. 1. modulation of the amplitude of a train of electric pulses used to carry signals (pulse carrier) Abbreviation: PAM.

  • Pulsebeat

    [puhls-beet] /ˈpʌlsˌbit/ noun 1. 1 (def 1). 2. a hint or intimation of feeling, desires, etc.: the pulsebeat of a town.



  • Pulse deficit

    pulse deficit n. The difference between the heart rate and the palpable pulse, as is often seen in atrial fibrillation.

  • Pulse-code modulation

    [puhls-kohd] /ˈpʌlsˌkoʊd/ noun, Telecommunications. 1. a form of modulation that transforms a wave-form, as an audio signal, into a binary signal in which information is conveyed by a coded order of pulses for transmission, storage on a disk, or processing by a computer. Abbreviation: PCM.



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