Putting



[poo t] /pʊt/

verb (used with object), put, putting.
1.
to move or place (anything) so as to get it into or out of a specific location or position:
to put a book on the shelf.
2.
to bring into some relation, state, etc.:
to put everything in order.
3.
to place in the charge or power of a person, institution, etc.:
to put a child in a special school.
4.
to subject to the endurance or suffering of something:
to put convicted spies to death.
5.
to set to a duty, task, action, etc.:
I put him to work setting the table.
6.
to force or drive to some course or action:
to put an army to flight.
7.
to render or translate, as into another language:
He put the novel into French.
8.
to provide (words) with music as accompaniment; set:
to put a poem to music.
9.
to assign or attribute:
You put a political interpretation on everything.
10.
to set at a particular place, point, amount, etc., in a scale of estimation:
I’d put the distance at five miles.
11.
to bet or wager:
to put two dollars on a horse.
12.
to express or state:
To put it mildly, I don’t understand.
13.
to apply, as to a use or purpose:
to put one’s knowledge to practical use.
14.
to set, give, or make:
to put an end to an ancient custom.
15.
to propose or submit for answer, consideration, deliberation, etc.:
to put a question before a committee.
16.
to impose, as a burden, charge, or the like:
to put a tax on luxury articles.
17.
to invest (often followed by in or into):
to put one’s money in real estate; to put one’s savings into securities.
18.
to lay the blame of (usually followed by on, to, etc.):
He put my failure to lack of experience.
19.
to throw or cast, especially with a forward motion of the hand when raised close to the shoulder:
to put the shot.
verb (used without object), put, putting.
20.
to go, move, or proceed:
to put to sea.
21.
Informal. to begin to travel:
to put for home.
22.
to shoot out or grow, or send forth shoots or sprouts.
noun
23.
a throw or cast, especially one made with a forward motion of the hand when raised close to the shoulder.
24.
Also called put option. Finance. an option that gives the right to sell a fixed amount of a particular stock at a predetermined price within a given time, purchased by a person who expects the stock to decline.
Compare (def 52).
Verb phrases
25.
put about,

26.
put across,

27.
put aside/by,

28.
put away,

29.
put down,

30.
put forth,

31.
put forward,

32.
put in,

33.
put in for, to apply for or request (something):
I put in for a transfer to another department.
34.
put off,

35.
put on,

36.
put out,

37.
put over,

38.
put through,

39.
put up,

40.
put upon, to take unfair advantage of; impose upon:
Some of the employees felt put upon when they were asked to work late.
41.
put up to, to provoke; prompt; incite:
Someone put him up to calling us.
42.
put up with, to endure; tolerate; bear:
I couldn’t put up with the noise any longer.
Idioms
43.
put it to, Slang.

44.
put oneself out, to take pains; go to trouble or expense:
She has certainly put herself out to see that everyone is comfortable.
45.
put something over on, to take advantage of; deceive:
He suspected that his friend had put something over on him, but he had no proof.
46.
put to it, to be confronted with a problem; have difficulty:
We were put to it to find the missing notebook.
47.
stay put, Informal. to remain in the same position; refuse to move:
The baby wouldn’t stay put, and kept trying to climb out of the playpen.
[puht] /pʌt/ Golf.
verb (used with or without object)
1.
to strike (the ball) gently so as to make it roll along the green into the hole.
noun
2.
an act of putting.
3.
a stroke made in putting.
/pʊt/
verb (mainly transitive) puts, putting, put
1.
to cause to be (in a position or place): to put a book on the table
2.
to cause to be (in a state, relation, etc): to put one’s things in order
3.
(foll by to) to cause (a person) to experience the endurance or suffering (of): to put to death, to put to the sword
4.
to set or commit (to an action, task, or duty), esp by force: he put him to work
5.
to render, transform, or translate: to put into English
6.
to set (words) in a musical form (esp in the phrase put to music)
7.
(foll by at) to estimate: he put the distance at fifty miles
8.
(foll by to) to utilize (for the purpose of): he put his knowledge to good use
9.
(foll by to) to couple a female animal (with a male) for the purpose of breeding: the farmer put his heifer to the bull
10.
to state; express: to put it bluntly
11.
to set or make (an end or limit): he put an end to the proceedings
12.
to present for consideration in anticipation of an answer or vote; propose: he put the question to the committee, I put it to you that one day you will all die
13.
to invest (money) in; give (support) to: he put five thousand pounds into the project
14.
to impart: to put zest into a party
15.
to throw or cast
16.
not know where to put oneself, to feel awkward or embarrassed
17.
put paid to, to destroy irrevocably and utterly: the manager’s disfavour put paid to their hopes for promotion
18.
stay put, to refuse to leave; keep one’s position
noun
19.
a throw or cast, esp in putting the shot
20.
(stock exchange) Also called put option. an option to sell a stated amount of securities at a specified price during a specified limited period Compare call (sense 58)
/pʌt/
noun
1.
a stroke on the green with a putter to roll the ball into or near the hole
verb
2.
to strike (the ball) in this way
v.

late Old English *putian, implied in putung “instigation, an urging,” literally “a putting;” related to pytan “put out, thrust out” (of eyes), probably from a Germanic stem that also produced Danish putte “to put,” Swedish dialectal putta; Middle Dutch pote “scion, plant,” Dutch poten “to plant,” Old Norse pota “to poke.”

Meaning “act of casting a heavy stone overhead” (as a trial of strength) is attested from c.1300. Obsolete past tense form putted is attested 14c.-15c. To put down “end by force or authority” (a rebellion, etc.) is from c.1300. Adjective phrase put out “angry, upset” is first recorded 1887; to put out, of a woman, “to offer oneself for sex” is from 1947. To put upon (someone) “play a trick on, impose on” is from 1690s. To put up with “tolerate, accept” (1755) was originally to put up, as in “to pocket.” To put (someone) on “deceive” is from 1958.
n.

c.1300, “act of throwing a weight overhand as a test of strength,” from put (v.). General meaning “act of putting” is from early 15c. Also cf. putt (n.).
v.

1510s, Scottish, “to push, shove,” a special use and pronunciation of put (v.). Golfing sense is from 1743. Meaning “to throw” (a stone, as a demonstration of strength) is from 1724; this also is the putt in shot putting. Related: Putted; putting.
n.

c.1300, “a putting, pushing, shoving, thrusting,” special use and pronunciation of put (n.). Golfing sense is from 1743.

Related Terms

off-putting

verb

To proffer or do the sex act; lay: With men buyers, you get them put and you can sell them the Brooklyn Bridge

Related Terms

know what one can do with something, tell someone what to do with something

[1930s+; a shortening of put out]

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