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Q



[kyoo] /kyu/

noun, plural Q’s or Qs, q’s or qs.
1.
the 17th letter of the English alphabet, a consonant.
2.
any spoken sound represented by the letter Q or q, as in quick, acquit, or Iraq.
3.
something having the shape of a Q .
4.
a written or printed representation of the letter Q or q.
5.
a device, as a printer’s type, for reproducing the letter Q or q.
1.
.
2.
Chess. .
Symbol.
1.
the 17th in order or in a series, or, when I is omitted, the 16th.
2.
(sometimes lowercase) the medieval Roman numeral for 500.
Compare .
3.
Biochemistry. .
4.
Physics. .
5.
Thermodynamics. a unit of heat energy, equal to 10 18 British thermal units (1.055 × 10 21 joules).
6.
Also called Q-factor. Electronics. the ratio of the reactance to the resistance of an electric circuit or component.
7.
Biblical Criticism. the symbol for material common to the Gospels of Matthew and Luke that was not derived from the Gospel of Mark.
1.
.
2.
.
3.
.
4.
.
5.
(in Guatemala) quetzal; quetzals.
1.
.
1.
quart; quarts.
2.
.
3.
.
4.
.
5.
.
[johnz] /dʒoʊnz/
noun
1.
Anson
[an-suh n] /ˈæn sən/ (Show IPA), 1798–1858, president of the Republic of Texas.
2.
Casey
[key-see] /ˈkeɪ si/ (Show IPA), (John Luther Jones) 1864–1900, U.S. locomotive engineer: folk hero of ballads, stories, and plays.
3.
Chuck (Charles Martin Jones) 1912–2002, U.S. film animator.
4.
Daniel, 1881–1967, English phonetician.
5.
Ernest, 1879–1958, Welsh psychoanalyst.
6.
(Everett) LeRoi
[luh-roi,, lee-roi] /ləˈrɔɪ,, ˈli rɔɪ/ (Show IPA) original name of .
7.
Henry Arthur, 1851–1929, English dramatist.
8.
Howard Mumford
[muhm-ferd] /ˈmʌm fərd/ (Show IPA), 1892–1980, U.S. educator and critic.
9.
Inigo
[in-i-goh] /ˈɪn ɪˌgoʊ/ (Show IPA), 1573–1652, English architect.
10.
John Luther (“Casey”) 1864–1900, legendary U.S. locomotive engineer, raised in Cayce, Ky.
11.
John Paul (John Paul) 1747–92, American naval commander in the Revolutionary War, born in Scotland.
12.
John Winston
[win-stuh n] /ˈwɪn stən/ (Show IPA), 1791–1848, U.S. politician: Speaker of the House 1843–45.
13.
Mary Harris (“Mother Jones”) 1830–1930, U.S. labor leader, born in Ireland.
14.
Quincy (Delight) (“Q”) born 1933, U.S. jazz musician, film composer and producer.
15.
Robert Edmond, 1887–1954, U.S. set designer.
16.
Robert Tyre
[tahyuh r] /taɪər/ (Show IPA), (“Bobby”) 1902–71, U.S. golfer.
17.
Rufus Matthew, 1863–1948, U.S. Quaker, teacher, author, and humanitarian.
18.
Sir William, 1746–94, English jurist, linguist, and Sanskrit scholar.
[kwil-er-kooch] /ˈkwɪl ərˈkutʃ/
noun
1.
Sir Arthur Thomas (“Q”) 1863–1944, English novelist and critic.
/kjuː/
noun (pl) q’s, Q’s, Qs
1.
the 17th letter and 13th consonant of the modern English alphabet
2.
a speech sound represented by this letter, in English usually a voiceless velar stop, as in unique and quick
symbol
1.
quintal
symbol
1.
(chess) queen
2.
question
3.
(physics) heat
abbreviation
4.
(text messaging) queue
/dʒəʊnz/
noun
1.
Daniel. 1881–1967, British phonetician
2.
Daniel. 1912–93, Welsh composer. He wrote nine symphonies and much chamber music
3.
David. 1895–1974, British artist and writer: his literary works, which combine poetry and prose, include In Parenthesis (1937), an account of World War I, and The Anathemata (1952)
4.
Digby (Marritt). Baron. born 1956, British businessman and politician; director-general of the Confederation of British Industry (2000–06); Minister of State for Trade and Investment (2007–08)
5.
Inigo (ˈɪnɪɡəʊ). 1573–1652, English architect and theatrical designer, who introduced Palladianism to England. His buildings include the Banqueting Hall of Whitehall. He also designed the settings for court masques, being the first to use the proscenium arch and movable scenery in England
6.
John Paul, original name John Paul. 1747–92, US naval commander, born in Scotland: noted for his part in the War of American Independence
7.
(Everett) Le Roi (ˈliːrɔɪ), Muslim name Imanu Amìri Baraka. born 1934, US Black poet, dramatist, and political figure
8.
Quincy. born 1933, US composer, arranger, conductor, record producer, and trumpeter, noted esp for his film scores and his collaborations in the recording studio with Michael Jackson
9.
Robert Tyre, known as Bobby Jones. 1902–71, US golfer: won a unique ‘grand slam’ in 1930 of US Open, US Amateur, British Open, and British Amateur championships
abbreviation
1.
quart
2.
quarter
3.
quarterly
abbreviation
1.
quartermaster
2.
Also q, (pl) Qq, qq. quarto
3.
Queen
4.
question
/ˌkwɪləˈkuːtʃ/
noun
1.
Sir Arthur (Thomas), known as Q. 1863–1944, British critic and novelist, who edited the Oxford Book of English Verse (1900)

16th letter of the classical Roman alphabet, from the Phoenician equivalent of Hebrew koph, qoph, which was used for the more guttural of the two “k” sounds in Semitic.

The letter existed in Greek, but was little used and not alphabetized; the stereotypical connection with -u- began in Latin. Anglo-Saxon scribes adopted the habit at first, but later used spellings with cw- or cu-. The qu- pattern returned to English with the Norman Conquest and had displaced cw- by c.1300. In some spelling variants of late Middle English, quh- also took work from wh-, especially in Scottish and northern dialects, e.g. Gavin Douglas, Provost of St. Giles, in his vernacular “Aeneid” of 1513:

Lyk as the rois in June with hir sueit smell
The marygulde or dasy doith excell.
Quhy suld I than, with dull forhede and vane,
With ruide engine and barrand emptive brane,
With bad harsk speche and lewit barbour tong,
Presume to write quhar thi sueit bell is rong,
Or contirfait sa precious wourdis deir?

Scholars use -q- alone to transliterate Semitic koph (e.g. Quran, Qatar, Iraq ). In Christian theology, Q has been used since 1901 to signify the hypothetical source of passages shared by Matthew and Luke, but not in Mark; in this sense probably it is an abbreviation of German Quelle “source.”

surname, literally “John’s (child);” see John. Phrase keep up with the Joneses (1913, American English) is from the title of a comic strip by Arthur R. Momand. The slang sense “intense desire, addiction” (1968) probably arose from earlier use of Jones as a synonym for “heroin,” presumably from the proper name, but the connection, if any, is obscure. Related: Jonesing.

jones (jōnz)
n.

noun

verb

: She’s jonesing for those diamond earrings

Related Terms

johnson, scag jones

[1960s+ Narcotics; origin unknown; perhaps an innocent code word used by addicts and dealers]
language
A very high level language by Per Bothner based on lazy generalised sequences. Q has lexical scope, and some support for logic programming[?] and constraint programming. The language includes small subsets of Common Lisp and Scheme.
Q was a test-bed for programming language ideas. Where APL uses arrays for looping, Q uses generalised sequences which may be infinite and may be stored or calculated on demand. It has macros, primitives to run programs, and an interactive command language.
Q is implemented in C++, and comes with an interpreter, compiler framework, libraries, and documentation. It runs on Linux and SUN-4 and should work on any 32-bit Unix.
Latest version: 1, as of 1993-06-07. Development stopped in 1994.
(http://kelso.bothner.com/~per/software/#Q ).
E-mail: Per Bothner .
(2000-05-22)
charge
1.
quarter
2.
queen
1.
quart
2.
quarter
3.
quarterly
4.
question
5.
quintal
6.
quire
quarto
see: mind one’s p’s and q’s
see:

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Read Also:

  • QA

    1. quality assurance. [kyoo uh n ey, uh nd] /ˈkyu ən ˈeɪ, ənd/ noun, Informal. 1. an exchange of questions and answers. abbreviation 1. Qatar abbreviation 1. Qatar (international car registration) also Q & A, 1954, abbreviation of question and answer (itself attested by 1817). Quality Assurance networking The country code for Qatar. (1999-01-27) 1. […]

  • Qa4

    Question-answering language. A procedural calculus for intuitive reasoning. A LISP-based pattern-matching language for theorem proving. “QA4, A Language for Writing Problem-Solving Programs”, J.F. Rulifson et al, Proc IFIP Congress 1968.



  • Qaanaaq

    [kah-nahk] /kɑˈnɑk/ noun 1. (def 3).

  • Qabalah

    /kəˈbɑːlə/ noun 1. a variant spelling of kabbalah



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