Quotations



[kwoh-tey-shuh n] /kwoʊˈteɪ ʃən/

noun
1.
something that is quoted; a passage quoted from a book, speech, etc.:
a speech full of quotations from Lincoln’s letters.
2.
the act or practice of quoting.
3.
Commerce.

/kwəʊˈteɪʃən/
noun
1.
a phrase or passage from a book, poem, play, etc, remembered and spoken, esp to illustrate succinctly or support a point or an argument
2.
the act or habit of quoting from books, plays, poems, etc
3.
(commerce) a statement of the current market price of a security or commodity
4.
an estimate of costs submitted by a contractor to a prospective client; tender
5.
(stock exchange) registration granted to a company or governmental body, enabling the shares and other securities of the company or body to be officially listed and traded
6.
(printing) a large block of type metal that is less than type-high and is used to fill up spaces in type pages
n.

mid-15c., “numbering,” later (1530s) “marginal notation,” noun of action from quote (v.) or else from Medieval Latin quotationem (nominative quotatio), noun of action from past participle stem of quotare “to number.” Meaning “an act of quoting” is from 1640s; that of “passage quoted” is from 1680s. Quotation marks attested by 1777.

from the Old Testament in the New, which are very numerous, are not made according to any uniform method. When the New Testament was written, the Old was not divided, as it now is, into chapters and verses, and hence such peculiarities as these: When Luke (20:37) refers to Ex. 3:6, he quotes from “Moses at the bush”, i.e., the section containing the record of Moses at the bush. So also Mark (2:26) refers to 1 Sam. 21:1-6, in the words, “in the days of Abiathar;” and Paul (Rom. 11:2) refers to 1 Kings ch. 17-19, in the words, “in Elias”, i.e., in the portion of the history regarding Elias. In general, the New Testament writers quote from the Septuagint (q.v.) version of the Old Testament, as it was then in common use among the Jews. But it is noticeable that these quotations are not made in any uniform manner. Sometimes, e.g., the quotation does not agree literally either with the LXX. or the Hebrew text. This occurs in about one hundred instances. Sometimes the LXX. is literally quoted (in about ninety instances), and sometimes it is corrected or altered in the quotations (in over eighty instances). Quotations are sometimes made also directly from the Hebrew text (Matt. 4:15, 16; John 19:37; 1 Cor. 15:54). Besides the quotations made directly, there are found numberless allusions, more or less distinct, showing that the minds of the New Testament writers were filled with the expressions and ideas as well as historical facts recorded in the Old. There are in all two hundred and eighty-three direct quotations from the Old Testament in the New, but not one clear and certain case of quotation from the Apocrypha (q.v.). Besides quotations in the New from the Old Testament, there are in Paul’s writings three quotations from certain Greek poets, Acts 17:28; 1 Cor. 15:33; Titus 1:12. These quotations are memorials of his early classical education.

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  • Quote chapter and verse

    [by analogy with the mainstream phrase] To cite a relevant excerpt from an appropriate bible. “I don’t care if “rn” gets it wrong; “Followup-To: poster” is explicitly permitted by RFC 1036. I’ll quote chapter and verse if you don’t believe me.” See also legalese, language lawyer, RTFS (sense 2). [Jargon File]

  • Quote

    [kwoht] /kwoʊt/ verb (used with object), quoted, quoting. 1. to repeat (a passage, phrase, etc.) from a book, speech, or the like, as by way of authority, illustration, etc. 2. to repeat words from (a book, author, etc.). 3. to use a brief excerpt from: The composer quotes Beethoven’s Fifth in his latest work. 4. […]



  • Quoted

    [kwoht] /kwoʊt/ verb (used with object), quoted, quoting. 1. to repeat (a passage, phrase, etc.) from a book, speech, or the like, as by way of authority, illustration, etc. 2. to repeat words from (a book, author, etc.). 3. to use a brief excerpt from: The composer quotes Beethoven’s Fifth in his latest work. 4. […]

  • Quoted company

    noun 1. a company whose shares are quoted on a stock exchange



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