[uh-dopt] /əˈdɒpt/

verb (used with object)
to choose or take as one’s own; make one’s own by selection or assent:
to adopt a nickname.
to take and rear (the child of other parents) as one’s own child, specifically by a formal legal act.
to take or receive into any kind of new relationship:
to adopt a person as a protégé.
to select as a basic or required textbook or series of textbooks in a course.
to vote to accept:
The House adopted the report.
to accept or act in accordance with (a plan, principle, etc.).
Verb phrases
adopt out, to place (a child) for adoption:
The institution may keep a child or adopt it out.
verb (transitive)
(law) to bring (a person) into a specific relationship, esp to take (another’s child) as one’s own child
to choose and follow (a plan, technique, etc)
to take over (an idea, etc) as if it were one’s own
to take on; assume: to adopt a title
to accept (a report, etc)

c.1500, a back-formation from adoption or else from Middle French adopter or directly from Latin adoptare “take by choice, choose for oneself, select, choose” (especially a child). Originally in English also of friends, fathers, citizens, etc. Sense of “to legally take as one’s own child” and that of “to embrace, espouse” a practice, method, etc. are from c.1600. Related: Adopted; adopting.


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