Readdress



[noun uh-dres, ad-res; verb uh-dres] /noun əˈdrɛs, ˈæd rɛs; verb əˈdrɛs/

noun
1.
a speech or written statement, usually formal, directed to a particular group of persons:
the president’s address on the state of the economy.
2.
a direction as to the intended recipient, written on or attached to a piece of mail.
3.
the place or the name of the place where a person, organization, or the like is located or may be reached:
What is your address when you’re in Des Moines?
4.
manner of speaking to persons; personal bearing in conversation.
5.
skillful and expeditious management; ready skill; dispatch:
to handle a matter with address.
6.
Computers.

7.
Government. a request to the executive by the legislature to remove a judge for unfitness.
8.
Usually, addresses. attentions paid by a suitor or lover; courtship.
9.
(usually initial capital letter) the reply to the king’s speech in the English Parliament.
10.
Obsolete. .
verb (used with object), addressed, addressing.
11.
to direct a speech or written statement to:
to address an assembly.
12.
to use a specified form or title in speaking or writing to: Address the president as “Mr. President.”.
13.
to direct to the attention:
He addressed his remarks to the lawyers in the audience.
14.
to apply in speech (used reflexively, usually followed by to):
He addressed himself to the leader.
15.
to deal with or discuss:
to address the issues.
16.
to put the directions for delivery on:
to address a letter.
17.
Commerce. to consign or entrust to the care of another, as agent or factor.
18.
to direct the energy or efforts of (usually followed by to):
He addressed himself to the task.
19.
to direct (data) to a specified location in an electronic computer.
20.
Golf. to take a stance and place the head of the club behind (the ball) preparatory to hitting it.
21.
Obsolete. to woo; court.
22.
Archaic. to give direction to; aim.
23.
Obsolete. to prepare.
verb (used without object), addressed or addrest, addressing. Obsolete.
24.
to make an appeal.
25.
to make .
/ˌriːəˈdrɛs/
verb (transitive)
1.
to look at or discuss (an issue, situation, etc) from a new or different point of view
2.
to put a forwarding address onto (a letter received)
/əˈdrɛs/
noun
1.
the conventional form by which the location of a building is described
2.
the written form of this, as on a letter or parcel, preceded by the name of the person or organization for whom it is intended
3.
the place at which someone lives
4.
a speech or written communication, esp one of a formal nature
5.
skilfulness or tact
6.
(archaic) manner or style of speaking or conversation
7.
(computing) a number giving the location of a piece of stored information See also direct access
8.
(Brit, government) a statement of the opinions or wishes of either or both Houses of Parliament that is sent to the sovereign
9.
the alignment or position of a part, component, etc, that permits correct assembly or fitting
10.
(usually pl) expressions of affection made by a man in courting a woman
verb (transitive) -dresses, -dressing, -dressed (obsolete or poetic) -drest
11.
to mark (a letter, parcel, etc) with an address
12.
to speak to, refer to in speaking, or deliver a speech to
13.
(used reflexively; foll by to)

14.
to direct (a message, warning, etc) to the attention of
15.
to consign or entrust (a ship or a ship’s cargo) to a factor, merchant, etc
16.
to adopt a position facing (the ball in golf, a partner in a dance, the target in archery, etc)
17.
to treat of; deal with: chapter 10 addresses the problem of transitivity
18.
an archaic word for woo
v.

early 14c., “to guide or direct,” from Old French adrecier “go straight toward; straighten, set right; point, direct” (13c.), from Vulgar Latin *addirectiare “make straight,” from Latin ad “to” (see ad-) + *directiare, from Latin directus “straight, direct” (see direct (v.)). Late 14c. as “to set in order, repair, correct.” Meaning “to write as a destination on a written message” is from mid-15c. Meaning “to direct spoken words (to someone)” is from late 15c. Related: Addressed; addressing.
n.

1530s, “dutiful or courteous approach,” from address (v.) and from French adresse. Sense of “formal speech” is from 1751. Sense of “superscription of a letter” is from 1712 and led to the meaning “place of residence” (1888).

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