Reassume



[uh-soom] /əˈsum/

verb (used with object), assumed, assuming.
1.
to take for granted or without proof:
to assume that everyone wants peace.
Synonyms: suppose, presuppose; postulate, posit.
2.
to take upon oneself; undertake:
to assume an obligation.
3.
to take over the duties or responsibilities of:
to assume the office of treasurer.
4.
to take on (a particular character, quality, mode of life, etc.); adopt:
He assumed the style of an aggressive go-getter.
5.
to take on; be invested or endowed with:
The situation assumed a threatening character.
6.
to pretend to have or be; feign:
to assume a humble manner.
7.
to appropriate or arrogate; seize; usurp:
to assume a right to oneself; to assume control.
8.
to take upon oneself (the debts or obligations of another).
9.
Archaic. to take into relation or association; adopt.
verb (used without object), assumed, assuming.
10.
to take something for granted; presume.
/əˈsjuːm/
verb (transitive)
1.
(may take a clause as object) to take for granted; accept without proof; suppose: to assume that someone is sane
2.
to take upon oneself; undertake or take on or over (a position, responsibility, etc): to assume office
3.
to pretend to; feign: he assumed indifference, although the news affected him deeply
4.
to take or put on; adopt: the problem assumed gigantic proportions
5.
to appropriate or usurp (power, control, etc); arrogate: the revolutionaries assumed control of the city
6.
(Christianity) (of God) to take up (the soul of a believer) into heaven
v.

early 15c., assumpten “to receive up into heaven” (especially of the Virgin Mary), also assumen “to arrogate,” from Latin assumere “to take up, take to oneself,” from ad- “to, up” (see ad-) + sumere “to take,” from sub “under” + emere “to take” (see exempt (adj.)).

Meaning “to suppose, to take for granted as the basis of argument” is first recorded 1590s; that of “to take or put on (an appearance, etc.)” is from c.1600. Related: Assumed; assuming. Early past participle was assumpt. In rhetorical usage, assume expresses what the assumer postulates, often as a confessed hypothesis; presume expresses what the presumer really believes.

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