noun, Botany.
an elongated cell whose walls contain perforations (sieve pores) that are arranged in circumscribed areas (sieve plates) and that afford communication with similar adjacent cells.
sieve cell
An elongated, food-conducting cell in phloem characteristic of gymnosperms. Sieve cells have pores through which nutrients flow from cell to cell, but they have no sieve plates like the more specialized sieve-tube elements of angiosperms. Compare sieve-tube element.


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