Sir harold



noun
1.
George (1st Baron Jeffreys of Wem) 1648–89, English jurist.
2.
Sir Harold, 1891–1989, British geophysicist and astronomer.
noun
1.
Sir Angus (Frank Johnstone)
[jon-stuh n,, -suh n] /ˈdʒɒn stən,, -sən/ (Show IPA), 1913–91, English writer.
2.
August, 1945-2005, U.S. playwright.
3.
Charles Thomson Rees
[tom-suh n-rees] /ˈtɒm sən ris/ (Show IPA), 1869–1959, Scottish physicist: Nobel prize 1927.
4.
Edith Bolling (Galt) 1872–1961, U.S. First Lady 1915–21 (second wife of Woodrow Wilson).
5.
Edmund, 1895–1972, U.S. literary and social critic.
6.
Ellen Louise Axson, 1860–1914, U.S. First Lady 1913–14 (first wife of Woodrow Wilson).
7.
Harriet, 1825–1900, U.S. novelist: first African American woman to publish a novel.
8.
Henry (Jeremiah Jones Colbath or Colbaith) 1812–75, U.S. politician: vice president of the U.S. 1873–75.
9.
James, 1742–98, U.S. jurist, born in Scotland: associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1789–98.
10.
Sir (James) Harold, 1916–95, British statesman: prime minister 1964–70, 1974–76.
11.
John (“Christopher North”) 1785–1854, Scottish poet, journalist, and critic.
12.
Lanford
[lan-ferd] /ˈlæn fərd/ (Show IPA), 1937–2011, U.S. playwright.
13.
Robert W(oodrow) born 1936, U.S. radio astronomer: Nobel Prize in physics 1978.
14.
Sloan, 1920–2003, U.S. journalist and novelist.
15.
(Thomas) Woodrow, 1856–1924, 28th president of the U.S. 1913–21: Nobel Peace Prize 1919.
16.
Mount, a mountain in SW California, near Pasadena: observatory. 5710 feet (1740 meters).
17.
a city in E North Carolina.
18.
a male given name.
noun
1.
Alexander. 1766–1813, Scottish ornithologist in the US
2.
Sir Angus (Frank Johnstone). 1913–91, British writer, whose works include the collection of short stories The Wrong Set (1949) and the novels Anglo-Saxon Attitudes (1956) and No Laughing Matter (1967)
3.
Charles Thomson Rees. 1869–1959, Scottish physicist, who invented the cloud chamber: shared the Nobel prize for physics 1927
4.
Edmund. 1895–1972, US critic, noted esp for Axel’s Castle (1931), a study of the symbolist movement
5.
(James) Harold, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx. 1916–95, British Labour statesman; prime minister (1964–70; 1974–76)
6.
Jacqueline. born 1945, British writer for older girls; her best-selling books include The Story of Tracey Beaker (1991), The Illustrated Mum (1998), and Girls in Tears (2002).
7.
Richard. 1714–82, Welsh landscape painter
8.
(Thomas) Woodrow (ˈwʊdrəʊ). 1856–1924, US Democratic statesman; 28th president of the US (1913–21). He led the US into World War I in 1917 and proposed the Fourteen Points (1918) as a basis for peace. Although he secured the formation of the League of Nations, the US Senate refused to support it: Nobel peace prize 1919
noun
1.
George, 1st Baron Jeffreys of Wem. ?1645–89, English judge, notorious for his brutality at the “Bloody Assizes” (1685), where those involved in Monmouth’s rebellion were tried
Wilson
(wĭl’sən)
British physicist noted for his research on atmospheric electricity. He developed the Wilson cloud chamber, a device that makes it possible to study and photograph the movement and interaction of electrically charged particles. He shared the 1927 Nobel Prize for physics with Arthur Compton.

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