causing or tending to cause sleep.
pertaining to or characterized by sleep or sleepiness; sleepy; drowsy.
something that causes sleep, as a medicine or drug.
Contemporary Examples

Yet Diana, with its soporific romance and awful dialogue, is a colossal bore.
Princess Diana Was the Girlfriend From Hell. Why Is This Movie So Boring? Tina Brown November 3, 2013

He sounds like a soporific senator defending the ugly compromises of Washington.
Rick Santorum’s Beltway Curse Is Hurting His 2012 Campaign Howard Kurtz February 23, 2012

The premise is this: turkey is chock-full of a soporific essential amino acid, tryptophan, one of the 22 essential amino acids.
Eat Turkey All You Want! It’s Not Going to Put You to Sleep Kent Sepkowitz November 21, 2012

Innocuous, soporific white guys like Rob Portman and T-Paw became the horses to bet on.
Romney Risks a Worse VP Pick Than Palin by Going With Boring Choice Michelle Cottle August 6, 2012

A travelogue of the drug-testing labs at Pfizer, Eli Lilly, or GlaxoSmithKline would likely be soporific.
Weed Reads: The 10 Best Books on Pot Roger Roffman April 26, 2014

Historical Examples

But it is inebriant, and not soporific; and its secondary sedative action on the heart is more powerful than that of Opium.
The Action of Medicines in the System Frederick William Headland

He had made up his mind that he might have to spend days in this soporific hamlet.
In Apple-Blossom Time Clara Louise Burnham

From which it appears evident that the actual words used as a soporific allow considerable latitude of choice.
Spirit and Music H. Ernest Hunt

The soporific, thwarted in its effect for a moment, redoubled its power over him.
The Knight of Malta Eugene Sue

To these soporific works of reference he apparently regarded the dramatist’s volume as a fitting pendant.
Shakespeare and the Modern Stage Sir Sidney Lee

inducing sleep
drowsy; sleepy
a drug or other agent that induces sleep

“tending to produce sleep,” 1680s, from French soporifique (17c.), formed in French from Latin sopor (genitive soporis) “deep sleep” (see sopor). As a noun from 1722. Earlier as an adjective was soporiferous (1580s as “characterized by excessive sleep,” c.1600 as “soporific”).

soporific sop·o·rif·ic (sŏp’ə-rĭf’ĭk, sō’pə-)

Inducing or tending to induce sleep.

Sleepy; drowsy.


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