an aromatic, Indian plant, Nardostachys jatamansi, of the valerian family, believed to be the nard of the ancients.
an aromatic substance used by the ancients, supposed to be obtained from this plant.
any of various other plants, especially an American plant, Aralia racemosa, of the ginseng family, having an aromatic root.
an aromatic Indian valerianaceous plant, Nardostachys jatamans, having rose-purple flowers
an aromatic ointment obtained from this plant
any of various similar or related plants
a North American araliaceous plant, Aralia racemosa, having small green flowers and an aromatic root

(Heb. nerd), a much-valued perfume (Cant. 1:12; 4:13, 14). It was “very precious”, i.e., very costly (Mark 14:3; John 12:3,5). It is the root of an Indian plant, the Nardostachys jatamansi, of the family of Valeriance, growing on the Himalaya mountains. It is distinguished by its having many hairy spikes shooting out from one root. It is called by the Arabs sunbul Hindi, “the Indian spike.” In the New Testament this word is the rendering of the Greek nardos pistike. The margin of the Revised Version in these passages has “pistic nard,” pistic being perhaps a local name. Some take it to mean genuine, and others liquid. The most probable opinion is that the word pistike designates the nard as genuine or faithfully prepared.


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