Take a stand



Adopt a firm position about an issue, as in She was more than willing to take a stand on abortion rights. This idiom alludes to the military sense of stand, “hold one’s ground against an enemy.” [ Mid-1800s ]

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  • Take at face value

    see: at face value

  • Take a turn for the better

    Improve, as in We thought she was on her deathbed but now she’s taken a turn for the better. The antonym is take a turn for the worse, meaning “get worse, deteriorate,” as in Unemployment has been fairly low lately, but now the economy’s taken a turn for the worse. This idiom employs turn in […]



  • Takeaway

    noun 1. something taken back or away, especially an employee benefit that is eliminated or substantially reduced by the terms of a union contract. 2. conclusions, impressions, or action points resulting from a meeting, discussion, roundtable, or the like: The takeaway was that we had to do a lot more work on the proposal before […]

  • Take-away

    noun 1. something taken back or away, especially an employee benefit that is eliminated or substantially reduced by the terms of a union contract. 2. conclusions, impressions, or action points resulting from a meeting, discussion, roundtable, or the like: The takeaway was that we had to do a lot more work on the proposal before […]



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