Take the liberty of



Act on one’s own authority without permission from another, as in I took the liberty of forwarding the mail to his summer address . It is also put as take the liberty to , as in He took the liberty to address the Governor by her first name . This rather formal locution was first recorded in 1625 and does not imply the opprobrium of the similar-sounding take liberties

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  • Take the load off

    Sit down, relax, as in I wish you’d take some time and take the load off. A shortening of take the load off one’s feet, this colloquial phrase dates from about 1940. It is sometimes put as take a load off.

  • Take the money and run

    take the heat



  • Take the pipe

    take the heat off

  • Take the pulse of

    Also, feel the pulse of. Try to determine the intentions or sentiments of a person or group, as in These exit polls allegedly take the pulse of the voters, but I don’t believe they’re very meaningful. [ First half of 1600s ]



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