the act of seizing, appropriating, or arrogating authority, control, management, etc.
an acquisition or gaining control of a corporation through the purchase or exchange of stock.
Contemporary Examples

Management is concerned about losing its role in case of a takeover by creditors or a rival airline.
American Airlines Suffers Its Worst Week Ever Daniel Gross October 1, 2012

Rep. John Culberson (R-TX) is worried about the takeover of foreign law.
The Hottest Constitutional Amendments of 2013 Ben Jacobs December 25, 2013

They financed the Republican takeover of the New York State Senate.
Hunger Games Comes to New York State’s Public Schools Zephyr Teachout November 25, 2014

The opposition is outgunned, although its takeover of Syrian military bases has narrowed the gap.
Back the Syrian Rebels. But Don’t Intervene P.J. Crowley December 3, 2012

Under law, the media regulation authority, Ofcom, can nix the takeover if the purchasers are not deemed “fit and proper persons.”
Knives Out Against Murdoch William Underhill July 6, 2011

To use a Wall Street term, the GOP takeover has already been factored into the market.
The Media’s Lousy Crystal Ball Howard Kurtz October 31, 2010

The worst effect of a Republican takeover would be on the environment.
If You Think D.C. Is Awful Now, Wait Until Wednesday Jonathan Alter November 3, 2014

Historical Examples

Dimitrov and Kalarov returned from Moscow, where they had been in exile since 1925, to assist the new government in its takeover.
Area Handbook for Bulgaria Eugene K. Keefe, Violeta D. Baluyut, William Giloane, Anne K. Long, James M. Moore, and Neda A. Walpole

Until the Communist takeover in 1944, there had been two broad social classes in the country, an upper and a lower class.
Area Handbook for Albania Eugene K. Keefe

What will justify such a volte-face and with what excuse can he repudiate the principles with which he justified his takeover?
The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 4 (of 6) Hippolyte A. Taine


1917, “an act of taking over,” noun derivative of verbal phrase take over (1884), from take (v.) + over. Attested from 1958 in the corporate sense.


Having to do with food bought to be eaten away from the place where it is prepared: pies she hoped to sell to the ”take-out” trade (1940s+)


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