Tune



a succession of musical sounds forming an air or melody, with or without the harmony accompanying it.
a musical setting of a hymn, poem, psalm, etc., usually in four-part harmony.
the state of being in the proper pitch:
to be in tune.
agreement in pitch; unison; harmony.
proper adjustment, as of radio instruments or circuits with respect to frequency.
harmonious relationship; accord; agreement.
Archaic. frame of mind; mood.
Obsolete. a tone or sound.
to adjust (a musical instrument) to a correct or given standard of pitch (often followed by up).
to adapt (the voice, song, etc.) to a particular tone, to the expression of a particular feeling, or the like.
to bring (someone or something) into harmony.
to adjust (a motor, mechanism, or the like) for proper functioning.
Radio and Television.

to adjust (a circuit, frequency, or the like) so as to bring it into resonance with another circuit, a given frequency, or the like.
to adjust (a receiving apparatus) so as to make it compatible in frequency with a transmitting apparatus whose signals are to be received.
to adjust (a receiving apparatus) so as to receive the signals of a particular transmitting station.

to put into or cause to be in a receptive condition, mood, etc.; bring into harmony or agreement.
Archaic.

to utter, sound, or express musically.
to play upon (a lyre).

to put a musical instrument in tune (often followed by up).
to give forth a musical sound.
to be in harmony or accord; become responsive.
tune in, to adjust a radio or television set so as to receive (signals, a particular station, etc.).
tune out,

to adjust a radio or television set so as to stop or avoid receiving (a station or channel).
Slang. to stop paying attention to a person, situation, etc.

tune up,

to cause a group of musical instruments to be brought to the same pitch.
to begin to sing.
to bring into proper operating order, as a motor:
Before starting on our trip we should have the car tuned up.

call the tune, to decide matters of policy; control:
He was technically running the business, but his father still called the tune.
change one’s tune, to reverse one’s views; change one’s mind:
She changed her tune about children when she married and had her own.
sing a different tune, to be forced to change one’s ways, attitude, behavior, etc.:
He will sing a different tune when he has to earn his own money.
to the tune of, Informal. in or about the amount of:
In order to expand, they will need capital to the tune of six million dollars.
Thomas James (“Tommy”) born 1939, U.S. dancer, choreographer, actor, singer, and director.
Contemporary Examples

Poll Question: Rubio, Ryan, or Bush…Which Endorsement Helps Romney Most? Ryan Prior March 29, 2012
Jon & Kate Plus 8 Little Victims? Wendy Murphy June 14, 2009
Red Carpet Underworld Marty Beckerman February 3, 2009
Oprah Changes Channels Kim Masters November 19, 2009
In North Dakota, Women Who Had the Choice to Abort Winston Ross March 28, 2013

Historical Examples

The King of the Mountains Edmond About
The Boy Who Knew What The Birds Said Padraic Colum
Mademoiselle of Monte Carlo William Le Queux
The Lost Princess of Oz L. Frank Baum
Tales Of Men And Ghosts Edith Wharton

noun
a melody, esp one for which harmony is not essential
the most important part in a musical texture: the cello has the tune at that point
the condition of producing accurately pitched notes, intervals, etc (esp in the phrases in tune, out of tune): he can’t sing in tune
accurate correspondence of pitch and intonation between instruments (esp in the phrases in tune, out of tune): the violin is not in tune with the piano
the correct adjustment of a radio, television, or some other electronic circuit with respect to the required frequency (esp in the phrases in tune, out of tune)
a frame of mind; disposition or mood
(obsolete) a musical sound; note
call the tune, to be in control of the proceedings
change one’s tune, sing another tune, sing another a different tune, to alter one’s attitude or tone of speech
(informal) to the tune of, to the amount or extent of: costs to the tune of a hundred pounds
verb
to adjust (a musical instrument or a changeable part of one) to a certain pitch
to adjust (a note, etc) so as to bring it into harmony or concord
(transitive) to adapt or adjust (oneself); attune: to tune oneself to a slower life
(transitive) often foll by up. to make fine adjustments to (an engine, machine, etc) to obtain optimum performance
(electronics) to adjust (one or more circuits) for resonance at a desired frequency
(obsolete) to utter (something) musically or in the form of a melody; sing
(South African, slang) tune someone grief, to annoy or harass someone
n.
v.

tune in
tune out
tune up

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