Abashed



ashamed or embarrassed; disconcerted:
My clumsiness left me abashed.
to destroy the self-confidence, poise, or self-possession of; disconcert; make ashamed or embarrassed:
to abash someone by sneering.
Contemporary Examples

When she came to power in 1978, Britain was a dreary, dreary place: dingy, funereal, abashed, scruffy, feckless.
How Margaret Thatcher Transformed British Politics Tunku Varadarajan April 7, 2013

Historical Examples

I stood before her abashed, and that was ridiculous, while she measured me as if I presented in myself the woman I took her to be.
The Pool in the Desert Sara Jeanette Duncan

Let ridicule be abashed before the majesty of such characters!
Female Scripture Biographies, Vol. II Francis Augustus Cox

He was a man of few words, naturally diffident of his colloquial powers, and easily confused and abashed.
Mark Hurdlestone Susanna Moodie

It humbled and abashed the man, and made him still more irresolute and uncertain.
Barnaby Rudge Charles Dickens

She laid an abashed cheek on his hands that were still fondling hers.
In the Heart of a Fool William Allen White

It was a situation which might have abashed a bolder ruffian.
The Avenger E. Phillips Oppenheim

Fondling the trembling creature against her cheek, she talked first to him, then to his abashed persecutors.
Maida’s Little Shop Inez Haynes Irwin

The ruler of Tripoli was abashed by this display of American energy and valor.
Harper’s Young People, August 3, 1880 Various

The strong double light revealed her face of abashed delight, although the young man did not understand it.
The Portion of Labor Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

adjective
ill at ease, embarrassed, or confused; ashamed
verb
(transitive; usually passive) to cause to feel ill at ease, embarrassed, or confused; make ashamed
v.

“perplex, embarrass,” early 15c., earlier “lose one’s composure, be upset” (late 14c.), from Old French esbaiss-, present stem of esbaer “gape with astonishment,” from es “out” (see ex-) + ba(y)er “to be open, gape,” from Latin *batare “to yawn, gape,” from root *bat, possibly imitative of yawning. Related: Abashed; abashing. Bashful is a 16c. derivative.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Abash

    to destroy the self-confidence, poise, or self-possession of; disconcert; make ashamed or embarrassed: to abash someone by sneering. Historical Examples Her reticence in that respect, however, did not in the least abash Jesse. The Eddy Clarence L. Cullen It would have been useless; nothing could alter or abash her inherent unmorality. Olive in Italy Moray […]

  • Abashment

    to destroy the self-confidence, poise, or self-possession of; disconcert; make ashamed or embarrassed: to abash someone by sneering. Historical Examples He will tell you with pride rather than with abashment that he is an empleado—a State dependent. The Philippine Islands John Foreman Crimsoning, Alrek fell from his hill of scorn to the valley of abashment. […]



  • Abasia

    inability to walk due to a limitation or absence of muscular coordination. abasia a·ba·sia (ə-bā’zhə) n. Inability to walk due to impaired muscular coordination. a·ba’sic (ə-bā’sĭk, -zĭk) or a·bat’ic (ə-bāt’ĭk) adj.

  • Abasia trepidans

    abasia trepidans abasia trepidans abasia trep·i·dans (trěp’ĭ-dānz’) n. Abasia due to trembling of the legs.



Disclaimer: Abashed definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.