Absinthe



a green, aromatic liqueur that is 68 percent alcohol, is made with and other herbs, and has a bitter, licorice flavor: now banned in most Western countries.
(def 2).
Contemporary Examples

I ask Cuco how The Verne Club gets illegal, over-proof alcohol like absinthe through the fine-toothed comb of Argentine customs.
The Absinthe-Minded Porteños of Buenos Aires Jeff Campagna March 9, 2014

They also brought labor unions, anarchism, socialism, and, of course, absinthe.
The Absinthe-Minded Porteños of Buenos Aires Jeff Campagna March 9, 2014

There is something about being in Captain Nemo’s Nautilus that makes the absinthe taste even better.
The Absinthe-Minded Porteños of Buenos Aires Jeff Campagna March 9, 2014

The absinthe ban lasted until 2010, when Articulo 1123 was ever-so-quietly repealed.
The Absinthe-Minded Porteños of Buenos Aires Jeff Campagna March 9, 2014

Again, the guys share their glass of absinthe—perhaps because they must remain alert for the next twenty hours of distillation.
The Absinthe-Minded Porteños of Buenos Aires Jeff Campagna March 9, 2014

Historical Examples

In France, it has been added fraudulently to absinthe, to improve its colour.
Poisons: Their Effects and Detection Alexander Wynter Blyth

The man grasped the proffered glass and swallowed, choking, the absinthe.
Melomaniacs James Huneker

“I’ve just been opalizing your absinthe for you,” he laughed, as we sat down.
Dreamers of the Ghetto I. Zangwill

It is called by Puller, with great glee, an “absinthe gummy.”
Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 93, September 3, 1887 Various

Certain alpine species are the flavouring ingredient in absinthe.
The New Gresham Encyclopedia. Vol. 1 Part 2 Various

noun
a potent green alcoholic drink, technically a gin, originally having high wormwood content
another name for wormwood (sense 1)
n.

also absinth, alcoholic liqueur distilled from wine mixed with wormwood (Artemisia Absinthium), 1842, from French absinthe, “essence of wormwood,” from Latin absinthum “wormwood,” from Greek apsinthion, perhaps from Persian (cf. Persian aspand, of the same meaning). The plant so called in English from c.1500 (Old English used the word in the Latin form).

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  • Absinthian

    a green, aromatic liqueur that is 68 percent alcohol, is made with and other herbs, and has a bitter, licorice flavor: now banned in most Western countries. (def 2). noun a potent green alcoholic drink, technically a gin, originally having high wormwood content another name for wormwood (sense 1) n. also absinth, alcoholic liqueur distilled […]

  • Absinthism

    noun (pathol) a diseased condition resulting from excessive drinking of absinthe



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