Absolve



to free from guilt or blame or their consequences:
The court absolved her of guilt in his death.
to set free or release, as from some duty, obligation, or responsibility (usually followed by from):
to be absolved from one’s oath.
to grant pardon for.
Ecclesiastical.

to grant or pronounce remission of sins to.
to remit (a sin) by .
to declare (censure, as excommunication) removed.

Contemporary Examples

He can absolve them completely, or let them go due to insufficient evidence, which is not the same as finding them not guilty.
Knox Awaits Verdict Barbie Latza Nadeau October 1, 2011

Many were just eager to forget, absolve, or overlook serious accusations, simply because doing so would be hugely convenient.
It’s Not Just Cosby: Hollywood’s Long List of Male Scumbags Asawin Suebsaeng November 18, 2014

Yet the essay does not absolve the Left from paranoid thinking.
Paranoia Crept into American Political Life a Long Time Ago Lewis Beale October 18, 2014

On the one hand, he is trying to absolve Skyler of his sins.
The 17 Most Iconic Scenes in ‘Breaking Bad’ (VIDEO) Tricia Romano September 28, 2013

Social media, Sharif emphasized, has been an indispensable tool for Saudi women “to absolve the gender apartheid.”
Aung San Suu Kyi Meets Her Peers Andy Isaacson September 29, 2012

Historical Examples

“I come to confess and to absolve thee,” answered the Grand Master.
The Talisman Sir Walter Scott

Were I to be queen of the universe, that dignity should not absolve me from my duty to you and to my father.
Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

Poor creatures come to you and confess their sins, and you absolve them, or order them to do penances?
A Foregone Conclusion William Dean Howells

There is no suggestion here that religion will absolve any man from bearing burdens.
Pax Vobiscum Henry Drummond

He then entered for a year as a sharpshooter of the Guards, to absolve his obligation to military service.
Beacon Lights of History, Volume X John Lord

verb (transitive)
(usually foll by from) to release from blame, sin, punishment, obligation, or responsibility
to pronounce not guilty; acquit; pardon
v.

early 15c., from Latin absolvere “set free, loosen, acquit,” from ab- “from” (see ab-) + solvere “loosen” (see solve). Related: Absolved; absolving.

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  • Absolvent

    to free from guilt or blame or their consequences: The court absolved her of guilt in his death. to set free or release, as from some duty, obligation, or responsibility (usually followed by from): to be absolved from one’s oath. to grant pardon for. Ecclesiastical. to grant or pronounce remission of sins to. to remit […]

  • Absolver

    to free from guilt or blame or their consequences: The court absolved her of guilt in his death. to set free or release, as from some duty, obligation, or responsibility (usually followed by from): to be absolved from one’s oath. to grant pardon for. Ecclesiastical. to grant or pronounce remission of sins to. to remit […]



  • Absonant

    dissonant; discordant (usually followed by from or to): behavior that is absonant to nature. Historical Examples absonant, ab′so-nant, adj. discordant: absurd: unnatural (with to or from)—opp. Chambers’s Twentieth Century Dictionary (part 1 of 4: A-D) Various

  • Absorb

    to suck up or drink in (a liquid); soak up: A sponge absorbs water. to swallow up the identity or individuality of; incorporate: The empire absorbed many small nations. to involve the full attention of; to engross or engage wholly: so absorbed in a book that he did not hear the bell. to occupy or […]



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