Abstracted



lost in thought; deeply engrossed or preoccupied.
thought of apart from concrete realities, specific objects, or actual instances:
an abstract idea.
expressing a quality or characteristic apart from any specific object or instance, as justice, poverty, and speed.
theoretical; not applied or practical:
abstract science.
difficult to understand; abstruse:
abstract speculations.
Fine Arts.

of or relating to the formal aspect of art, emphasizing lines, colors, generalized or geometrical forms, etc., especially with reference to their relationship to one another.
(often initial capital letter) pertaining to the nonrepresentational art styles of the 20th century.

a summary of a text, scientific article, document, speech, etc.; epitome.
something that concentrates in itself the essential qualities of anything more extensive or more general, or of several things; essence.
an idea or term considered apart from some material basis or object.
an abstract work of art.
to draw or take away; remove.
to divert or draw away the attention of.
to steal.
to consider as a general quality or characteristic apart from specific objects or instances:
to abstract the notions of time, space, and matter.
to make an abstract of; summarize.
abstract away from, to omit from consideration.
in the abstract, without reference to a specific object or instance; in theory:
beauty in the abstract.
Contemporary Examples

In a society that has exoticized and abstracted the military, MacLeish re-humanizes it.
The Army Life, Mundane and Hideously Violent, by Turns Brian Van Reet August 28, 2013

Historical Examples

The marriage was not there, neither was there any sign of its having been abstracted.
Mildred Arkell, (Vol 3 of 3) Ellen Wood

He is silent and abstracted, like one just returned from the cave of Trophonius.
Philothea Lydia Maria Child

One look at the beautiful face of his love sufficed; she was dreamy, abstracted; she seemed hardly to notice his entrance.
A Fair Mystery Bertha M. Clay

Had it been abstracted while the letter was still in his office?
The Channings Mrs. Henry Wood

There was in her eyes, however, an unquiet sadness; she had abstracted moments when her mind seemed fixed on some vexing problem.
The Weavers, Complete Gilbert Parker

I understood, abstracted four of the five kittens, and disappeared.
Concerning Cats Helen M. Winslow

Whether the individual can ever be abstracted from his conditions and remain himself is not a question that we need here discuss.
Introduction to the Science of Sociology Robert E. Park

“I’ve noticed she has seemed depressed, or abstracted,” he replied.
The Mystery of Murray Davenport Robert Neilson Stephens

He was silent, abstracted, his eye was full of inquietude, and wandered with perpetual restlessness.
Ormond, Volume I (of 3) Charles Brockden Brown

adjective
lost in thought; preoccupied
taken out or separated; extracted
adjective (ˈæbstrækt)
having no reference to material objects or specific examples; not concrete
not applied or practical; theoretical
hard to understand; recondite; abstruse
denoting art characterized by geometric, formalized, or otherwise nonrepresentational qualities
defined in terms of its formal properties: an abstract machine
(philosophy) (of an idea) functioning for some empiricists as the meaning of a general term: the word “man” does not name all men but the abstract idea of manhood
noun (ˈæbstrækt)
a condensed version of a piece of writing, speech, etc; summary
an abstract term or idea
an abstract painting, sculpture, etc
in the abstract, without reference to specific circumstances or practical experience
verb (transitive) (æbˈstrækt)
to think of (a quality or concept) generally without reference to a specific example; regard theoretically
to form (a general idea) by abstraction
(also intransitive) (ˈæbstrækt). to summarize or epitomize
to remove or extract
(euphemistic) to steal
adj.

late 14c., originally in grammar (of nouns), from Latin abstractus “drawn away,” past participle of abstrahere “to drag away; detach divert,” from ab(s)- “away” (see ab-) + trahere “draw” (see tract (n.1)).

Meaning “withdrawn or separated from material objects or practical matters” is from mid-15c. That of “difficult to understand, abstruse” is from c.1400. Specifically in reference to modern art, it dates from 1914; abstract expressionism as an American-based uninhibited approach to art exemplified by Jackson Pollack is from 1952, but the term itself had been used in the 1920s of Kandinsky and others.

Oswald Herzog, in an article on “Der Abstrakte Expressionismus” (Sturm, heft 50, 1919) gives us a statement which with equal felicity may be applied to the artistic attitude of the Dadaists. “Abstract Expressionism is perfect Expressionism,” he writes. “It is pure creation. It casts spiritual processes into a corporeal mould. It does not borrow objects from the real world; it creates its own objects …. The abstract reveals the will of the artist; it becomes expression. …” [William A. Drake, “The Life and Deeds of Dada,” 1922]

n.

“abridgement or summary of a document,” mid-15c., from abstract (adj.). The general sense of “a smaller quantity containing the virtue or power of a greater” [Johnson] is recorded from 1560s.
v.

1540s, from Latin abstractus or else from the adjective abstract. Related: Abstracted; abstracting, abstractedly.

abstract ab·stract (āb-strākt’, āb’strākt’)
adj.

Considered apart from concrete existence.

Not applied or practical; theoretical.

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Read Also:

  • Abstractedly

    lost in thought; deeply engrossed or preoccupied. Historical Examples He looks gloomily and abstractedly into the red logs of the wood fire. Vera Nevill Mrs. H. Lovett Cameron Charles looked at his father for permission, who said abstractedly, “Give it her.” Howards End E. M. Forster He came back, however, in a few minutes, and […]

  • Abstracting

    thought of apart from concrete realities, specific objects, or actual instances: an abstract idea. expressing a quality or characteristic apart from any specific object or instance, as justice, poverty, and speed. theoretical; not applied or practical: abstract science. difficult to understand; abstruse: abstract speculations. Fine Arts. of or relating to the formal aspect of art, […]



  • Abstracting journal

    a periodical consisting mainly or entirely of abstracts of current works.

  • Abstracting service

    a service that provides abstracts of publications on a subject or group of related subjects, usually on a subscription basis.



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