to give consent, approval, or adherence; agree; assent; to accede to a request; to accede to the terms of a contract.
to attain or assume an office, title, or dignity; succeed (usually followed by to):
to accede to the throne.
International Law. to become a party to an agreement, treaty, or the like, by way of .
Contemporary Examples

The debate has been often held about Google’s role in acceding to the Chinese government’s demands to censor search results.
Jeff Jarvis Asks: Is Google an Evil Empire? Dave Kansas January 28, 2009

Historical Examples

In the event of your acceding to my request it is probable that I shall have to narrate them to you.
Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

She seemed to feel that her demand was right and proper, and his acceding to it the least he could do.
Keziah Coffin Joseph C. Lincoln

Perhaps he sees that he cannot help himself and that he less parts with dignity by acceding.
1492 Mary Johnston

I am sorry to be obliged to refuse you, but I should not be justified in acceding to your request.
Under the Meteor Flag Harry Collingwood

But, vain as he was, he did not even wish to have the appearance of acceding to the original plan of Sarka!
Astounding Stories of Super-Science July 1930 Various

He could get rid of them now, now and for ever, by acceding to the proposition made to him.
Ralph the Heir Anthony Trollope

Clive, unwilling to face a coalition between the French and the nabob, was in favour of acceding to the nabob’s orders.
With Clive in India G. A. Henty

Then acceding to his request, each man retired to his own home.
Ponce de Leon William Pilling

They stated that they had “no hesitation in acceding to the Edinburgh Committee’s construction,” and adhering to the moves.
Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 68, No. 417, July, 1850 Various

verb (intransitive) usually foll by to
to assent or give one’s consent; agree
to enter upon or attain (to an office, right, etc): the prince acceded to the throne
(international law) to become a party (to an agreement between nations, etc), as by signing a treaty

early 15c., from Latin accedere “approach, enter upon,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + cedere “go, move” (see cede). Latin ad- usually became ac- before “k” sounds. Related: Acceded; acceding.


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