Accentuating



to give emphasis or prominence to.
to mark or pronounce with an .
Historical Examples

I shall be able to cast a glance at my fifty volumes, tearing out the bad pages, accentuating the best ones.
Balzac Frederick Lawton

Now it rose, now it fell, accentuating the silence dense about it.
The Speaker, No. 5: Volume II, Issue 1 Various

Or the effect that this must have in accentuating (p. 195) munitions shortage may have been overlooked, obvious as it was.
Experiences of a Dug-out, 1914-1918 Sir Stanley Maude

“And nothing to you,” said Burchill, accentuating his habitual drawl.
The Herapath Property J. S. Fletcher

Figures 178 and 179 show a better form of enrichment by accentuating the outline.
Industrial Arts Design William H. Varnum

I therefore played from c to e, accentuating e in particular.
Lola Henny Kindermann

The maker had doubtless no thought of accentuating the feminine figure.
The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2) Anatole France

The searchlight still shot steadily, a golden bar of light athwart the darkness and accentuating it by contrast.
The Radio Boys on Secret Service Duty Gerald Breckenridge

Of those present, six men were injured, and one woman exhibited a black eye, accentuating her other abnormalities.
The Hell Ship Raymond Alfred Palmer

“And I—I was ignorant,” exclaimed M. de Rnal, growing as angry as before and accentuating his words.
The Red and the Black Stendhal

verb
(transitive) to stress or emphasize
v.

1731, from Medieval Latin accentuatus, past participle of accentuare “to accent,” from Latin accentus (see accent (n.)). Originally “to pronounce with an accent;” meaning “emphasize” is recorded from 1865.

You’ve got to accentuate the positive
Eliminate the negative
Latch on to the affirmative
Don’t mess with Mister In-Between

[“Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive,” 1944, music by Harold Arlen, lyrics by Johnny Mercer]

Related: Accentuated; accentuating.

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  • Accentuation

    an act or instance of . something that is . Historical Examples The unit of displacement becomes the whole period intervening between any two adjacent points of accentuation. Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 Various If there is little inflection and no accentuation the result is bad. The Strand Magazine Various Otherwise the original has been […]

  • Accentuator

    Electronics. a circuit or network inserted to provide less loss or greater gain to certain frequencies in an audio spectrum, as a preemphasis spectrum. a person or thing that . accentuator ac·cen·tu·a·tor (āk-sěn’chōō-ā’tər) n. A substance, such as aniline, that allows an otherwise impossible combination between a histologic element and a stain.



  • Accept of

    to take or receive (something offered); receive with approval or favor: to accept a present; to accept a proposal. to agree or consent to; accede to: to accept a treaty; to accept an apology. to respond or answer affirmatively to: to accept an invitation. to undertake the responsibility, duties, honors, etc., of: to accept the […]

  • Accept

    to take or receive (something offered); receive with approval or favor: to accept a present; to accept a proposal. to agree or consent to; accede to: to accept a treaty; to accept an apology. to respond or answer affirmatively to: to accept an invitation. to undertake the responsibility, duties, honors, etc., of: to accept the […]



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