Accost



to confront boldly:
The beggar accosted me for money.
to approach, especially with a greeting, question, or remark.
(of prostitutes, procurers, etc.) to solicit for sexual purposes.
a greeting.
Contemporary Examples

Or, even more embarrassingly, she did and opted to accost Aslan about his religion regardless of the claims in his book.
Speed Read: The Six Most Controversial Reza Aslan Claims About Jesus Lizzie Crocker July 29, 2013

The dreamer tries to help, and fends off a man who is about to accost her with lecherous intentions.
Book Bag: André Aciman’s Favorite Novellas of Unconsummated Loves André Aciman December 31, 2012

Historical Examples

He could wear a fair outside, and accost me in a pleasant voice, like you.’
A Life’s Secret Mrs. Henry Wood

He was not to accost her in the presence of any other person.
The Avenger E. Phillips Oppenheim

When the service was over, we were about to enter the carriage, when who should accost us but Harcourt.
Japhet in Search of a Father Frederick Marryat

He entered the room slowly, uncertain how to accost Mr. Danforth.
Paul Prescott’s Charge Horatio Alger

The troopers decided to accost the man from the outside exit, rather than subjecting the Cubs to possible gunfire.
Dan Carter and the Money Box Mildred A. Wirt

After that the child was told how to accost the servants and the governess.
Heidi Johanna Spyri

In the mean time the jeweller had entered; he remained respectfully at the door, and waited for the queen to accost him.
Napoleon and the Queen of Prussia L. Mhlbach,

He desired Maurice to accost him, but no better result ensued.
Fairy Fingers Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie

verb
(transitive) to approach, stop, and speak to (a person), as to ask a question, accuse of a crime, solicit sexually, etc
noun
(rare) a greeting
v.

1570s, from Middle French accoster “move up to,” from Italian accostare or directly from Late Latin accostare “come up to the side,” from Latin ad- “to” (see ad-) + costa “rib, side” (see coast (n.)). The original notion is of fleets of warships attacking an enemy’s coast. Related: Accosted; accosting.

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  • Accosted

    (of animals) represented as side by side: two dolphins accosted. to confront boldly: The beggar accosted me for money. to approach, especially with a greeting, question, or remark. (of prostitutes, procurers, etc.) to solicit for sexual purposes. a greeting. Contemporary Examples The doctors were accosted by local settlers, and the Arab doctors and their families […]

  • Accosts

    to confront boldly: The beggar accosted me for money. to approach, especially with a greeting, question, or remark. (of prostitutes, procurers, etc.) to solicit for sexual purposes. a greeting. Historical Examples Everyone who accosts us asks for whisky, which seems to be scarce. The houseboat book William F. Waugh If any one accosts you on […]



  • Accouchement

    the confinement of childbirth; lying-in. Historical Examples In about two days after the accouchement, the horde proceeded on their journey, as if nothing had happened. A History of the Gipsies Walter Simson A French doctor was suspended, for an error in the accouchement of a lady. A Five Years’ Residence in Buenos Ayres George Thomas […]

  • Accoucheur

    a person who assists during childbirth, especially an obstetrician. Historical Examples This was the name of an accoucheur god, whose priest went, when sent for, and prayed for the safety of the patient. Samoa, A Hundred Years Ago And Long Before George Turner The disadvantages of the method are entirely with the accoucheur and not […]



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