act or state of ; state of being .
that which is ; an amount, number, or mass.
growth by continuous additions, as of interest to principal.
Contemporary Examples

In both countries, the rulers place the accumulation of wealth far ahead of the welfare of the nation.
Ukraine’s Revolutionary Lesson for Russia David Satter March 1, 2014

Some of us, it turns out, are actually happy to be here—exhausted by what Salwen terms the “accumulation Years.”
Selling Your House For Charity Courtney E. Martin February 19, 2010

And if you go through enough of it, this accumulation comes to be your calling card of wisdom.
It’s Not Just the Vaccines. Jenny McCarthy’s New Book Offers More ‘Lessons’ Tim Teeman April 27, 2014

That accumulation of identities is already a sine qua non when speaking of Hispanics, like Zimmerman.
George Zimmerman, Hispanics, and the Messy Nature of American Identity Ilan Stavans April 5, 2012

Third, the news is more than the accumulation of facts strung together.
The Honorable Press Baron Steve Weinberg March 18, 2010

Historical Examples

Their forefathers were stationed there before them, and thus there has been an accumulation of local knowledge.
Hodge and His Masters Richard Jefferies

It has been the accumulation of years, and was intended as a provision for you and Robert.
Brave and Bold Horatio Alger

The greatest difficulty that was experienced was due to the accumulation of rime on the instruments.
South! Sir Ernest Shackleton

This place is remarkable for the accumulation of Aztec and Spanish antiquities.
Aztec Land Maturin M. Ballou

Where subsistence was scant, accumulation was at least slow.
The Quest for a Lost Race Thomas E. Pickett

the act or process of collecting together or becoming collected
something that has been collected, gathered, heaped, etc

the continuous growth of capital by retention of interest or earnings
(in computing the yield on a bond purchased at a discount) the amount that is added to each yield to bring the cost of the bond into equality with its par value over its life Compare amortization (sense 2)

the taking of a first and an advanced university degree simultaneously

late 15c., from Latin accumulationem (nominative accumulatio) “a heaping up,” noun of action from past participle stem of accumulare “to heap up, amass,” from ad- “in addition” (see ad-) + cumulare “heap up,” from cumulus “heap” (see cumulus).


Read Also:

  • Accumulative

    tending to or arising from ; cumulative. tending to wealth; acquisitive. Historical Examples These last men are seldom if ever idealists; they see the world as it is, are men of order and of accumulative tendency. Memoir of Rev. Joseph Badger Elihu G. Holland Next: ‘Aia’ is generally an accumulative yet depreciative termination. The Browning […]

  • Accumulatively

    tending to or arising from ; cumulative. tending to wealth; acquisitive. Historical Examples It rolls up continually, accumulatively; and another fifty years will show more advance than the past five hundred. The home Charlotte Perkins Gilman

  • Accumulator

    a person or thing that . a register or electric device on an arithmetic machine, as an adding machine, cash register, or digital computer, that receives a number and produces and stores the results of arithmetic operations of the given number with other numbers. British. a storage battery or storage cell. an apparatus that stores […]

  • Accuracy

    the condition or quality of being true, correct, or exact; freedom from error or defect; precision or exactness; correctness. Chemistry, Physics. the extent to which a given measurement agrees with the standard value for that measurement. Compare (def 6). Mathematics. the degree of correctness of a quantity, expression, etc. Compare (def 5). Contemporary Examples Now, […]

Disclaimer: Accumulation definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.