Accuse



to charge with the fault, offense, or crime (usually followed by of):
He accused him of murder.
to find fault with; blame.
to make an .
Contemporary Examples

It went on to accuse the company itself of misleading the committee and acting to cover up the scandal.
British Lawmakers: Rupert Murdoch Unfit to Run News Corp. Peter Jukes, Mike Giglio April 30, 2012

Mayweather stands as the only person to ever accuse Manny Pacquiao of PED use.
If Manny Pacquiao Loses to Timothy Bradley, This May Be the End Allen Barra April 11, 2014

I would not accuse Mr. Kristol of McCarthyite tactics, however, since that would be an insult to McCarthy.
The New GOP Warmongers Matt Latimer March 21, 2011

Three men have come forward to accuse Sesame Street puppeteer Kevin Clash of having sex with them when they were minors.
Kevin Clash’s Accusers Speak Out About Sex With Elmo Puppeteer Maria Elena Fernandez December 5, 2012

They’ll accuse me of being “Islamophobic,” despite the fact that I’m Muslim.
All-American Muslim: Why Advertisers Are Right to Boycott Asra Q. Nomani December 14, 2011

Historical Examples

At any moment it may open, and the dead appear to accuse her.
The Castle Of The Shadows Alice Muriel Williamson

I let her accuse me as she pleased—and she very soon began to defend me.
Tales And Novels, Volume 9 (of 10) Maria Edgeworth

Her purse now contained three shillings, and she certainly could not accuse herself of any extravagance in the matter of diet.
The Palace Beautiful L. T. Meade

My sins also came into my mind, and my conscience did accuse me on every side.
Bunyan James Anthony Froude

Yet there is no one whom I can accuse for my misfortunes; they, and the distresses of my family, are the work of my own hands.
Wilson’s Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Vol. XX Alexander Leighton

verb
to charge (a person or persons) with some fault, offence, crime, etc; impute guilt or blame
v.

c.1300, “charge (with an offense, etc.), impugn, blame,” from Old French acuser “to accuse, indict, reproach, blame” (13c.), earlier “announce, report, disclose” (12c.), or directly from Latin accusare “to call to account,” from ad- “against” (see ad-) + causari “give as a cause or motive,” from causa “reason” (see cause (n.)). Related: Accused; accusing; accusingly.

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  • Accusal

    . Historical Examples I could not forget that in very truth Ruth’s accusal had been the result of this verdict. The Mystery of the Hidden Room Marion Harvey She could face his accusal if only he could give the reason for it. The Coast of Chance Esther Chamberlain But the strange mental or spiritual power […]

  • Accusant

    to charge with the fault, offense, or crime (usually followed by of): He accused him of murder. to find fault with; blame. to make an . verb to charge (a person or persons) with some fault, offence, crime, etc; impute guilt or blame v. c.1300, “charge (with an offense, etc.), impugn, blame,” from Old French […]



  • Accusation

    a charge of wrongdoing; imputation of guilt or blame. the specific offense charged: The accusation is murder. the act of or state of being . Contemporary Examples In addition to that accusation, Peres was for a long time viewed as a politician interested only in furthering his own position. The Abba Eban Factor Brent E. […]

  • Accusatival

    pertaining to the case.



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