Aconite



any plant belonging to the genus Aconitum, of the buttercup family, having irregular flowers usually in loose clusters, including species with poisonous and medicinal properties.
Historical Examples

The great man soon vanished, leaving behind him a harmless preparation of aconite and ipecacuanha.
A Son of Hagar Sir Hall Caine

They are only aconite and lettuce; and if I might ask for a little fresh water.
The Bramleighs Of Bishop’s Folly Charles James Lever

Arsenic was known to them as “sam,” aconite as “boschka,” and ergot probably as “son.”
Poison Romance and Poison Mysteries C. J. S. Thompson

There was the awesome efficiency of wolfsbane with its deadly store of aconite.
The Status Civilization Robert Sheckley

From aconite root, by a similar formula to that of Belladonna c. (below).
Cooley’s Cyclopdia of Practical Receipts and Collateral Information in the Arts, Manufactures, Professions, and Trades…, Sixth Edition, Volume I Arnold Cooley

Give the patient aconite once in two hours, for a day after the accident.
An Epitome of Homeopathic Healing Art B. L. Hill

Alkaloid from aconite, prepared according to process of Duquesnel.
Merck’s 1899 Manual Merck & Co.

Uncrystallised aconitia is sometimes contaminated with delphinia, as well as with aconella, another constituent of aconite root.
Cooley’s Cyclopdia of Practical Receipts and Collateral Information in the Arts, Manufactures, Professions, and Trades…, Sixth Edition, Volume I Arnold Cooley

Granting this, there must be some trace of the container of the aconite, before it was placed in the glass.
The Curved Blades Carolyn Wells

In rheumatic pains, unaccompanied with local swelling or redness, aconite is frequently of very great service.
Cooley’s Cyclopdia of Practical Receipts and Collateral Information in the Arts, Manufactures, Professions, and Trades…, Sixth Edition, Volume I Arnold Cooley

noun
any of various N temperate plants of the ranunculaceous genus Aconitum, such as monkshood and wolfsbane, many of which are poisonous Compare winter aconite
the dried poisonous root of many of these plants, sometimes used as an antipyretic
n.

poisonous plant (also known as monkshood and wolf’s bane), 1570s, from French aconit, from Latin aconitum, from Greek akoniton, of unknown origin.

aconite ac·o·nite (āk’ə-nīt’)
n.
The dried poisonous root of various herbs of the genus Aconitum containing aconitine, used externally as an analgesic.

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