Acquiescing



to assent tacitly; submit or comply silently or without protest; agree; consent:
to acquiesce halfheartedly in a business plan.
Contemporary Examples

But acquiescing to talks without a settlement freeze would be a major backtrack for Abbas and probably hurt his public standing.
Obama’s Calculated Middle East Game: Can He Bring Peace? Dan Ephron May 19, 2011

By acquiescing to the formation of a new state, Telangana, India is setting a dangerous precedent of ethnic division.
India’s Newest State Telangana Is Bosnia Redux Kranti Rai March 21, 2014

The liberals have allowed that belief to emerge by acquiescing in conservative inconsistency.
Originalists Making It Up Again: McCutcheon and ‘Corruption’ Lawrence Lessig April 1, 2014

In the Internet era, it offers indelible evidence of acquiescing to something evil in our politics.
New GOP “Racist” Headache John Avlon July 5, 2009

But acquiescing to that pessimism means acquiescing to new spasms of terrible violence.
The Conversation Israel and Palestine Needs to Have Peter Beinart, Alan M. Dershowitz December 2, 2012

Historical Examples

I ended by acquiescing in the slow revolution of its wheel of work and play.
The Works of Max Beerbohm Max Beerbohm

The last nine are her reply, acquiescing with a sad dignity.
A Syllabus of Kentucky Folk-Songs Hubert G. Shearin

I came here with the determination of acquiescing in whatever should be desired in respect to organization.
Letters and Literary Memorials of Samuel J. Tilden, v. 1 Samuel J. Tilden

And more, he was angry with himself for acquiescing in that self understood agreement.
At Fault Kate Chopin.

She laughed again, acquiescing in his humour, secretly thankful not to find him sentimental.
Mr. Crewe’s Career, Complete Winston Churchill

verb
(intransitive; often foll by in or to) to comply (with); assent (to) without protest
v.

1610s, from Middle French acquiescer (16c.), from Latin acquiescere “to become quiet, remain at rest,” thus “be satisfied with,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + quiescere “to become quiet,” from quies (genitive quietis) “rest, quiet” (see quiet (n.)). Related: Acquiesced; acquiescing.

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  • Acquired

    to come into possession or ownership of; get as one’s own: to acquire property. to gain for oneself through one’s actions or efforts: to acquire learning. Linguistics. to achieve native or nativelike command of (a language or a linguistic rule or element). Military. to locate and track (a moving target) with a detector, as radar. […]



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