Acutely



sharp or severe in effect; intense:
acute sorrow; an acute pain.
extremely great or serious; crucial; critical:
an acute shortage of oil.
(of disease) brief and severe (opposed to ).
sharp or penetrating in intellect, insight, or perception:
an acute observer.
extremely sensitive even to slight details or impressions:
acute eyesight.
sharp at the end; ending in a point.
Geometry.

(of an angle) less than 90°.
(of a triangle) containing only acute angles.

consisting of, indicated by, or bearing the mark ´, placed over vowel symbols in some languages to show that the vowels or the syllables they are in are pronounced in a certain way, as in French that the quality of an e so marked is close; in Hungarian that the vowel is long; in Spanish that the marked syllable bears the word accent; in Ibo that it is pronounced with high tones; or in classical Greek, where the mark originated, that the syllable bears the word accent and is pronounced, according to the ancient grammarians, with raised pitch (opposed to ):
the acute accent; an acute e.
the acute accent.
Contemporary Examples

As I wrote above, Israel is acutely sensitive to its public image, and most Israelis want to be part of the community of nations.
Liberal Zionists Should Support BDS Jerry Haber February 10, 2013

Little did Bowie know that the muscle pain was due to an “acutely blocked artery.”
David Bowie’s Vanishing Act—and Looming Return Chris Lee June 5, 2012

When the body of Johnson was exhumed, the medical examiner was acutely chagrined when six .22 caliber rounds were removed from it.
The Myth of the Central Park Five Edward Conlon October 18, 2014

McKamey had already been acutely aware of the danger of head injury in football.
Navy Football Player Will McKamey Died This Week From Brain Injury. Who’s to Blame? Michael Daly March 26, 2014

The troops are acutely attuned to signs of political expediency.
Toadying to the Tea Party Howard Kurtz May 30, 2011

Historical Examples

She could well understand the misery it must bring to see one most dear having to suffer so acutely.
Molly Brown’s College Friends Nell Speed

Now he was active, acutely aware of himself and all his wants.
The Spenders Harry Leon Wilson

I was acutely miserable, he went so fast; but Lady Torquilin liked it.
An American Girl in London Sara Jeannette Duncan

The parson was acutely moved for the anguish he had not probed.
Meadow Grass Alice Brown

And of enlightenment on a particular subject, in which she was acutely and personally interested, she stood in some need.
The Unbearable Bassington Saki

adjective
penetrating in perception or insight
sensitive to details; keen
of extreme importance; crucial
sharp or severe; intense: acute pain, an acute drought
having a sharp end or point
(maths)

(of an angle) less than 90°
(of a triangle) having all its interior angles less than 90°

(of a disease)

arising suddenly and manifesting intense severity
of relatively short duration Compare chronic (sense 2)

(phonetics)

(of a vowel or syllable in some languages with a pitch accent, such as ancient Greek) spoken or sung on a higher musical pitch relative to neighbouring syllables or vowels
of or relating to an accent (´) placed over vowels, denoting that the vowel is pronounced with higher musical pitch (as in ancient Greek), with a certain special quality (as in French), etc Compare (for senses 8a, 8b) grave, circumflex

(of a hospital, hospital bed, or ward) intended to accommodate short-term patients with acute illnesses
noun
an acute accent
adj.

late 14c., originally of fevers and diseases, “coming and going quickly” (opposed to a chronic), from Latin acutus “sharp, pointed,” figuratively “shrill, penetrating; intelligent, cunning,” past participle of acuere “sharpen” (see acuity). Meaning “sharp, irritating” is from early 15c. Meaning “intense” is from 1727. Related: Acutely; acuteness.

acute a·cute (ə-kyōōt’)
adj.

Pointed at the end; sharp.

Of or relating to a disease or a condition with a rapid onset and a short, severe course.

Of or relating to a patient afflicted with such a disease.

acute
(ə-kyt’)

Reacting readily to stimuli or impressions, as hearing or eyesight; sensitive.

Relating to an illness that has a rapid onset and follows a short but severe course. Compare chronic.

Having an acute angle.

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  • Acuteness

    sharp or severe in effect; intense: acute sorrow; an acute pain. extremely great or serious; crucial; critical: an acute shortage of oil. (of disease) brief and severe (opposed to ). sharp or penetrating in intellect, insight, or perception: an acute observer. extremely sensitive even to slight details or impressions: acute eyesight. sharp at the end; […]

  • Acutes

    sharp or severe in effect; intense: acute sorrow; an acute pain. extremely great or serious; crucial; critical: an acute shortage of oil. (of disease) brief and severe (opposed to ). sharp or penetrating in intellect, insight, or perception: an acute observer. extremely sensitive even to slight details or impressions: acute eyesight. sharp at the end; […]



  • Acutilingual

    having a sharply pointed tongue or mouth, as certain bees. Historical Examples acutilingual: with a sharp pointed tongue or mouth structure, as in some bees. Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology John. B. Smith

  • Acvd

    acvd arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease



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