Adapting



to make suitable to requirements or conditions; adjust or modify fittingly:
They adapted themselves to the change quickly. He adapted the novel for movies.
to adjust oneself to different conditions, environment, etc.:
to adapt easily to all circumstances.
Contemporary Examples

adapting your own book is like performing open-heart surgery on your own child.
Jonathan Tropper: How I Write Noah Charney July 2, 2013

Some of this is just a natural part of adapting to the natural climate change that is happening in the Arctic.
Russia Preps Its North Pole Invasion Dave Majumdar November 7, 2014

In fact, Planned Parenthood is moving ahead and adapting to cope with the more stringent regulations.
Pro-Choice Texas Will Not Back Down Emily Shire March 27, 2014

She has also been adapting books for the screen and “playing around with making short films.”
Evan Rachel Wood Grows Up Rachel Syme June 15, 2009

Paul Thomas Anderson, director of Boogie Nights and There Will Be Blood, has taken on the task of adapting Vice for the screen.
Viral Video of the Day: The ‘Inherent Vice’ Trailer Is Loopy Fun Alex Chancey September 29, 2014

Historical Examples

The carriers were doing a certain work, which required brisk movements, and were adapting the song and the refrain to them.
Foma Gordyeff Maxim Gorky

Don Santiago had the secret of adapting himself to the weaknesses of his flock.
Mayflower (Flor de mayo) Vicente Blasco Ibez

It was a tribute to her power of adapting herself to her environment.
The Literary Sense E. Nesbit

Very well, we of Genoa and Texcoco are adapting to the present situation.
Adaptation Dallas McCord Reynolds

He also succeeded experimentally in adapting his engine to a road carriage.
Inventions in the Century William Henry Doolittle

verb
(often foll by to) to adjust (someone or something, esp oneself) to different conditions, a new environment, etc
(transitive) to fit, change, or modify to suit a new or different purpose: to adapt a play for use in schools
v.

early 15c. (implied in adapted) “to fit (something, for some purpose),” from Middle French adapter (14c.), from Latin adaptare “adjust,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + aptare “join,” from aptus “fitted” (see apt). Meaning “to undergo modification so as to fit new circumstances” (intransitive) is from 1956. Related: Adapting.
American Disabled for Attendant Programs Today

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Adaption

    the act of adapting. the state of being adapted; adjustment. something produced by adapting: an adaptation of a play for television. Biology. any alteration in the structure or function of an organism or any of its parts that results from natural selection and by which the organism becomes better fitted to survive and multiply in […]

  • Adaptions

    the act of adapting. the state of being adapted; adjustment. something produced by adapting: an adaptation of a play for television. Biology. any alteration in the structure or function of an organism or any of its parts that results from natural selection and by which the organism becomes better fitted to survive and multiply in […]



  • Adaptive

    serving or able to ; showing or contributing to : the adaptive coloring of a chameleon. Contemporary Examples What adaptive technology has been the most useful or important for you? ‘The Paralyzed Bride’ Talks Life & Sex as a 27-Year-Old Quadriplegic February 26, 2013 To see the adaptive benefits of depression, it helps to consider […]

  • Adaptive answering

    adaptive answering communications A feature which allows a faxmodem to answer the telephone and decide whether the incoming call is a fax or data call. Most Class 1 faxmodems do this. The U.S. Robotics Class 1 implementation however seems not to do it, it must be set to answer as either one or the other. […]



Disclaimer: Adapting definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.