Adduce



to bring forward in argument or as evidence; cite as pertinent or conclusive:
to adduce reasons in support of a constitutional amendment.
Contemporary Examples

One would expect Lebens to adduce evidence from other cases of state sanctions.
Boycott the Occupation, Engage the Settlers Jerry Haber December 2, 2012

Historical Examples

We could adduce many instances to corroborate this assertion.
The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor, Vol. I, No. 4, April 1810 Various

If, however, it will satisfy you that I adduce an illustration—Louisa Bellew was one of these.
Jack Hinton Charles James Lever

But it remains to us to adduce clearer evidence to show that in the Rmyaṇam Rmas is the sun, and St the dawn, or aurora.
Zoological Mythology, Volume I (of 2) Angelo de Gubernatis

Why, then, do I adduce the name of Bruno at the close of this lecture?
Mind and Motion and Monism George John Romanes

We are able now to adduce various arguments which severally prove this truth.
Letters on Astronomy Denison Olmsted

Among many proofs that I could adduce of this, I will give one.
Old Familiar Faces Theodore Watts-Dunton

I need not adduce passages in the Hebrew Psalter, where such ellipsises do occur.
Notes and Queries, Number 213, November 26, 1853 Various

We may adduce also as evidence of the same practice a passage in bk.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 Various

I do not adduce it as a fair criterion of comparative excellence, nor do I even think it such; but merely as matter of fact.
Biographia Literaria Samuel Taylor Coleridge

verb
(transitive) to cite (reasons, examples, etc) as evidence or proof
v.

early 15c., from Latin adducere “lead to, bring to, bring along,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + ducere “to lead” (see duke (n.)). Related: Adduced; adducing.

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  • Adducent

    drawing toward, as by the action of a muscle; .

  • Adduct

    Physiology. to move or draw toward the axis of the body or one of its parts (opposed to ). Also called addition compound. Chemistry. a combination of two or more independently stable compounds by means of van der Waals’ forces, coordinate bonds, or covalent bonds. Compare (def 2), . Historical Examples And yet, in the […]



  • Adducted

    Physiology. to move or draw toward the axis of the body or one of its parts (opposed to ). Also called addition compound. Chemistry. a combination of two or more independently stable compounds by means of van der Waals’ forces, coordinate bonds, or covalent bonds. Compare (def 2), . Historical Examples This usually occurs when […]

  • Adduction

    Physiology. the action of an muscle. the act of . Historical Examples Dislocation is a rare complication of hip disease, and is most likely to occur during the stage of adduction with inversion. Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities–Head–Neck. Sixth Edition. Alexander Miles Had the adduction of his mind compelled hers to his bidding, or […]



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