Adeptness



very skilled; proficient; expert:
an adept juggler.
a skilled or proficient person; expert.
Contemporary Examples

adeptness in the performance of our values must be ever-present, but identifying and sticking with those values come first.
Liberals Need to Learn to Say No Bernhard Schlink July 9, 2014

Historical Examples

Also his adeptness in dodging was called upon more and more.
The Young Pitcher Zane Grey

His eye is always upon his neighbour’s defects, and I never cease to marvel at its adeptness.
Brother Copas Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

Some men are born with an adeptness for crime of a certain character.
How to Become Rich William Windsor

An adeptness at discovering grievances has lately been one of the principal recommendations to public notice and popular applause.
Novanglus, and Massachusettensis John Adams

And when night drew near and they made camp, what joy it was to hear her exclamations of wonder at his adeptness!
The Crimson Gardenia and Other Tales of Adventure Rex Beach

She answered shortly enough, and the skimming of the milk was not done with the adeptness which she usually displayed.
The Hound From The North Ridgwell Cullum

He didn’t handle them with the adeptness of a Belt man, but he wasn’t too awkward.
Anchorite Randall Garrett

If so, the little trick had been done with deplorable spontaneity or adeptness of usage.
Lord Ormont and his Aminta, Complete George Meredith

Lubimoff was astonished at the way this woman spoke in all seriousness of her present adeptness.
The Enemies of Women Vicente Blasco Ibez

adjective (əˈdɛpt)
very proficient in something requiring skill or manual dexterity
skilful; expert
noun (ˈædɛpt)
a person who is skilled or proficient in something
adj.

1690s, “completely skilled” from Latin adeptus “having reached, attained,” past participle of adipisci “to come up with, arrive at,” figuratively “to attain to, acquire,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + apisci “grasp, attain,” related to aptus “fitted” (see apt). Related: Adeptly.
n.

“an expert,” especially “one who is skilled in the secrets of anything,” 1660s, from Latin adeptus (see adept (adj.)). The Latin adjective was used as a noun in this sense in Medieval Latin among alchemists.

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    as much or as good as necessary for some requirement or purpose; fully sufficient, suitable, or fit (often followed by to or for): This car is adequate to our needs. adequate food for fifty people. barely sufficient or suitable: Being adequate is not good enough. Law. reasonably sufficient for starting legal action: adequate grounds. Contemporary […]

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