Adjourn



to suspend the meeting of (a club, legislature, committee, etc.) to a future time, another place, or indefinitely:
to adjourn the court.
to defer or postpone to a later time:
They adjourned the meeting until the following Monday.
to defer or postpone (a matter) to a future meeting of the same body.
to defer or postpone (a matter) to some future time, either specified or not specified.
to postpone, suspend, or transfer proceedings.
to go to another place:
to adjourn to the parlor.
Contemporary Examples

[H]e may adjourn them to such Time as he shall think proper.
Obama’s Congressional Test Michael Tomasky August 9, 2011

Boehner turned the vote to adjourn into a proxy battle over the tax cuts, and Speaker Pelosi won by a mere 210 votes to 209.
The GOP’s Secret Weapon Reihan Salam September 30, 2010

Historical Examples

So now, gentlemen, if the Court will permit, I would like to adjourn till to-morrow morning.
The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Vol. 10 (of 12) Robert G. Ingersoll

But there was a general cry to adjourn, and the clerk declared the House adjourned.
John Quincy Adams John. T. Morse

I must tell you a short anecdote—But shall we adjourn to the terrace?
Tom Burke Of “Ours”, Volume II (of II) Charles James Lever

It took only a minute to elect Christy and adjourn the ill-fated meeting.
Betty Wales Senior Margaret Warde

I might talk easier too, if we could adjourn to the window alcove over there.
Torchy, Private Sec. Sewell Ford

There were some, and Sieyès among them, who proposed that they should adjourn to Paris.
Lectures on the French Revolution John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton

The fear was that Congress might adjourn without a conclusion.
Albert Gallatin John Austin Stevens

It was then agreed to adjourn till three o’clock in the afternoon.
The Peace Negotiations J. D. Kestell

verb
(intransitive) (of a court, etc) to close at the end of a session
to postpone or be postponed, esp temporarily or to another place
(transitive) to put off (a problem, discussion, etc) for later consideration; defer
(intransitive) (informal)

to move elsewhere: let’s adjourn to the kitchen
to stop work

v.

early 14c., ajournen, “assign a day” (for convening or reconvening), from Old French ajourner (12c.) “meet” (at an appointed time), from the phrase à jorn “to a stated day” (à “to” + journ “day,” from Latin diurnus “daily;” see diurnal).

The sense is to set a date for a re-meeting. Meaning “to close a meeting” (with or without intention to reconvene) is from early 15c. Meaning “to go in a body to another place” (1640s) is colloquial. The unhistorical -d- was added 16c. Related: Adjourned; adjourning.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Adjourned

    to suspend the meeting of (a club, legislature, committee, etc.) to a future time, another place, or indefinitely: to adjourn the court. to defer or postpone to a later time: They adjourned the meeting until the following Monday. to defer or postpone (a matter) to a future meeting of the same body. to defer or […]

  • Adjourning

    to suspend the meeting of (a club, legislature, committee, etc.) to a future time, another place, or indefinitely: to adjourn the court. to defer or postpone to a later time: They adjourned the meeting until the following Monday. to defer or postpone (a matter) to a future meeting of the same body. to defer or […]



  • Adjournment

    the act of or the state or period of being . Contemporary Examples Second, the two houses of Congress must disagree about the time of adjournment. Obama’s Congressional Test Michael Tomasky August 9, 2011 Historical Examples The committee sat for a short time to draw up rules of procedure and arrange an adjournment. Boycotted Talbot […]

  • Adjt.

    . adjutant



Disclaimer: Adjourn definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.