Adjudge



to declare or pronounce formally; decree:
The will was adjudged void.
to award or assign judicially:
The prize was adjudged to him.
to decide by a judicial opinion or sentence:
to adjudge a case.
to sentence or condemn:
He was adjudged to die.
to deem; consider; think:
It was adjudged wise to avoid war.
Historical Examples

It was pretended that the Academy of Arcadians were to adjudge and decree the crown.
A Decade of Italian Women, v. II (of 2) T. Adolphus Trollope

We speak of a bond instead of a mortgage, and we adjudge where we ought to foreclose.
The Book-Hunter John Hill Burton

You are certainly not unhappy because you make eyes at the moon, and adjudge life to be vanity and vexation.
The Potiphar Papers George William Curtis

That son he was about to adjudge to the gibbet and the hangman!
Paul Clifford, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton

The law went so far as to adjudge to the purchaser of fruits anything found among these fruits.
Jesus the Christ James Edward Talmage

No one can adjudge our modern large cities a healthy product.
Woman and Socialism August Bebel

It was held competent for the court to adjudge any punishment short of death.
The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 11 Various

The khan sent his embassador to Vladimir, there to summon before him the two princes and their friends and to adjudge their cause.
The Empire of Russia John S. C. Abbott

Now, Moiron seemed so normal, so quiet, so rational and sensible that it seemed impossible to adjudge him insane.
Original Short Stories, Volume 3 (of 13) Guy de Maupassant

A mistake in taste for which the wisdom of the future will adjudge a punishment called trigamy.
The Devil’s Dictionary Ambrose Bierce

verb (transitive; usually passive)
to pronounce formally; declare: he was adjudged the winner

to determine judicially; judge
to order or pronounce by law; decree: he was adjudged bankrupt
to award (costs, damages, etc)

(archaic) to sentence or condemn
v.

late 14c., “to make a judicial decision,” from Old French ajugier “to judge, pass judgment on,” from Latin adiudicare “grant or award as a judge,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + iudicare “to judge,” which is related to iudicem (see judge (v.)). Sense of “to have an opinion” is from c.1400. Related: Adjudged; adjudging.

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  • Adjudged

    to declare or pronounce formally; decree: The will was adjudged void. to award or assign judicially: The prize was adjudged to him. to decide by a judicial opinion or sentence: to adjudge a case. to sentence or condemn: He was adjudged to die. to deem; consider; think: It was adjudged wise to avoid war. Contemporary […]

  • Adjudicate

    to pronounce or decree by judicial sentence. to settle or determine (an issue or dispute) judicially. to sit in judgment (usually followed by upon). Contemporary Examples First, Congress should eliminate the power of federal courts to adjudicate separation of powers cases. After Health-Care Ruling, Time to Reconsider Supreme Court’s Power David R. Dow July 7, […]



  • Adjudicated

    to pronounce or decree by judicial sentence. to settle or determine (an issue or dispute) judicially. to sit in judgment (usually followed by upon). Contemporary Examples In fact, opposing sides of the issue are still clinging to the same flawed arguments as they were when Crawford was adjudicated. Why Judge Posner Changed His Mind On […]

  • Adjudicates

    to pronounce or decree by judicial sentence. to settle or determine (an issue or dispute) judicially. to sit in judgment (usually followed by upon). Contemporary Examples The ICJ adjudicates on disputes between states and its rulings are binding. Serbia and Croatia’s Competing Genocide Claims Adam LeBor March 10, 2014 Historical Examples Not in the judicial […]



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