Admirable



worthy of ; inspiring approval, reverence, or affection.
excellent; first-rate.
Contemporary Examples

But if anything, President Obama has demonstrated an admirable nimbleness in response to changing circumstances.
Whose Side Is Obama on? Reihan Salam June 15, 2009

They are often characterized as benevolent and admirable; when we do the same, we are angry and unreasonable.
The Unbearable Whiteness of Protesting Rawiya Kameir, Judnick Mayard December 9, 2014

As Phillips conveyed, in interviews so admirable for their candor, there is no right way to sort it out.
Philly Sportswriter Bill Conlin’s Shame: Accused of Child Molestation Buzz Bissinger December 21, 2011

And our immune system, admirable and dedicated protector of our health, is making us sneeze our brains out.
Blame Climate Change for Your Terrible Seasonal Allergies Kent Sepkowitz May 13, 2014

As admirable as the U.S. fightback against Belgium was the pride and gusto of their fans.
Home of the (Footballing) Brave: The U.S. Bested Britain in World Cup Spirit Emma Woolf July 6, 2014

Historical Examples

His work abounds in an ingenious and admirable mingling of wit and humor.
Jokes For All Occasions Anonymous

Like the admirable Crichton, no art is to her unknown, no accomplishment by her neglected.
The Bacillus of Beauty Harriet Stark

Two admirable instructors were at hand—the army and the navy.
The War in the Air; Vol. 1 Walter Raleigh.

Betty, it must be owned, has an admirable memory on these occasions.
Clarissa, Volume 2 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

These books are admirable for supplementary reading classes.
Arbor Day Leaves N.H. Egleston

adjective
deserving or inspiring admiration; excellent
adj.

mid-15c., “worthy of admiration,” from Middle French admirable (Old French amirable), from Latin admirabilis “admirable, wonderful,” from admirari “to admire” (see admiration). In early years it also carried a stronger sense of “awe-inspiring.”

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Admirability

    worthy of ; inspiring approval, reverence, or affection. excellent; first-rate. adjective deserving or inspiring admiration; excellent adj. mid-15c., “worthy of admiration,” from Middle French admirable (Old French amirable), from Latin admirabilis “admirable, wonderful,” from admirari “to admire” (see admiration). In early years it also carried a stronger sense of “awe-inspiring.”

  • Admirable bolete

    an edible mushroom, Boletus mirabilis, of Rocky Mountain and Pacific northwestern evergreen forests, having a dark-red, scaly or woolly cap with yellow pores and a stout stem.



  • Admirable crichton

    James (“the Admirable Crichton”) 1560?–82, Scottish scholar and linguist. Michael, 1942–2008, U.S. novelist. a comedy (1902) by Sir James M. Barrie. noun James. 1560–82, Scottish scholar and writer, called the Admirable Crichton because of his talents (John) Michael. 1942–2008, US novelist, screenwriter, and film director; his thrillers, many of which have been filmed, include The […]

  • Crichton

    James (“the Admirable Crichton”) 1560?–82, Scottish scholar and linguist. Michael, 1942–2008, U.S. novelist. Contemporary Examples “The YA market is growing up faster than in years past, because of news, blogs, and Internet content,” Crichton explains. The Next Twilight? Isabel Wilkinson March 19, 2009 Historical Examples And remember this, Crichton, for the time being you are […]



Disclaimer: Admirable definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.