Admiration



a feeling of wonder, pleasure, or approval.
the act of looking on or contemplating with pleasure:
admiration of fine paintings.
an object of wonder, pleasure, or approval:
The dancer was the admiration of everyone.
Archaic. wonder; astonishment.
Contemporary Examples

Displaying both brings a level of respect and admiration that many yearn to have.
FAMU ‘Marching 100’ Case Raises Veil on Secret Hazing Rituals Allison Samuels May 7, 2012

So what if much of his admiration toward Chang also seems like one big backhanded compliment.
America’s Bad Boy Chef Jacob Bernstein June 12, 2010

I have great respect and admiration for Calderon, for her learning and for her work setting up so-called secular yeshivas.
Religion And State In Ruth Calderon’s Knesset Speech Zachary Braiterman February 14, 2013

But Bossie’s admiration faded swiftly after Inauguration Day.
Clinton Nemesis Now After Obama Benjamin Sarlin September 29, 2010

Thackeray freely, openly, and often admitted his admiration for Hitler, his book, the Nazis, and their methods.
Hitler’s Strange Afterlife in India Dilip D’Souza November 29, 2012

Historical Examples

There was no doubt about the young man’s admiration for Pamela.
The Hall and the Grange Archibald Marshall

Then he licked his chops and looked in admiration on his worldly friend.
A Night Out Edward Peple

Have you never given cause to another to—to—suspect any admiration on your part?
Trevlyn Hold Mrs. Henry Wood

He seemed to have no inordinate desire for admiration or even for approbation.
Weighed and Wanting George MacDonald

His black eyes were of the audacious sort, and he flashed a glance of admiration at Patty.
Patty’s Social Season Carolyn Wells

noun
pleasurable contemplation or surprise
a person or thing that is admired: she was the admiration of the court
(archaic) wonder
n.

early 15c., “wonder,” from Middle French admiration (14c.) or directly from Latin admirationem (nominative admiratio) “a wondering at, admiration,” noun of state from past participle stem of admirari “admire,” from ad- “at” (see ad-) + mirari “to wonder,” from mirus “wonderful” (see miracle). The sense has weakened steadily since 16c.
see: mutual admiration society

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  • Nil admirari

    to wonder at nothing. Historical Examples For I, you know, never could subscribe to the rule of the nil admirari, which cramps and destroys our best enjoyments. Tour in England, Ireland, and France, in the years 1826, 1827, 1828 and 1829. Hermann Pckler-Muskau There is generally among the Corps Diplomatique a note of nil admirari. […]

  • Admirative

    a feeling of wonder, pleasure, or approval. the act of looking on or contemplating with pleasure: admiration of fine paintings. an object of wonder, pleasure, or approval: The dancer was the admiration of everyone. Archaic. wonder; astonishment. noun pleasurable contemplation or surprise a person or thing that is admired: she was the admiration of the […]



  • Admire

    to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval. to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically): I admire your audacity. to feel or express . Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire: I would admire to go. be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to admire: He’s admiring of his brother’s […]

  • Admirer

    to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval. to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically): I admire your audacity. to feel or express . Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire: I would admire to go. be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to admire: He’s admiring of his brother’s […]



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