Admissibility



that may be allowed or conceded; allowable:
an admissible plan.
capable or worthy of being :
admissible evidence.
Historical Examples

(c) A third dispute turned upon the admissibility of non-Trinitarians to the privilege of co-operation.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Slice 7 Various

Logic is the architect of this region, and for it there is no limit to the admissibility of hypotheses.
The Mystery of Space Robert T. Browne

England has adopted a simple and concise law on admissibility of testimony of handwriting experts.
Disputed Handwriting Jerome B. Lavay

If there is some question about admissibility of the charted enlargements, it is well to prepare an extra uncharted set.
The Science of Fingerprints Federal Bureau of Investigation

The next requisite for the admissibility of a hypothesis is its sufficiency.
The Critique of Pure Reason Immanuel Kant

Not a little doubt had been felt by the court when deliberating upon the admissibility of the testimony of the old negro.
The Storm Centre Charles Egbert Craddock

Objections of like nature in general go to the weight, not to the admissibility, of evidence.
The Path of the Law Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

The same disposition to construe everything in favor of the faith governed the admissibility of witnesses of evil character.
A History of The Inquisition of The Middle Ages; volume I Henry Charles Lea

Bob didnt know quite what was the law governing the admissibility of testimony in a case like his.
Nothing But the Truth Frederic S. Isham

For even those writers who maintain the admissibility of pacific blockade assert that vessels of third States cannot be seized.
International Law. A Treatise. Volume II (of 2) Lassa Francis Oppenheim

adjective
able or deserving to be considered or allowed
deserving to be admitted or allowed to enter
(law) (esp of evidence) capable of being or bound to be admitted in a court of law
n.

1763, from admissible + -ity.
adj.

1610s, from Middle French admissible, from past participle stem of Latin admittere (see admit). Legal sense is recorded from 1849.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Admission

    the act of allowing to enter; entrance granted by permission, by provision or existence of pecuniary means, or by the removal of obstacles: the admission of aliens into a country. right or permission to enter: granting admission to the rare books room. the price paid for entrance, as to a theater or ball park. an […]

  • Admissive

    tending to . Historical Examples The tone was admissive, and as if she had said, “That is another thing!” Real Folks Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney I have been thus precise, because criticism is to me not “a game,” nor admissive of cogging and falsification. Notes and Queries, Number 197, August 6, 1853 Various



  • Admit

    to allow to enter; grant or afford entrance to: to admit a student to college. to give right or means of entrance to: This ticket admits two people. to permit to exercise a certain function or privilege: admitted to the bar. to permit; allow. to allow or concede as valid: to admit the force of […]

  • Admit of

    to allow to enter; grant or afford entrance to: to admit a student to college. to give right or means of entrance to: This ticket admits two people. to permit to exercise a certain function or privilege: admitted to the bar. to permit; allow. to allow or concede as valid: to admit the force of […]



Disclaimer: Admissibility definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.